THE CARTER CENTER
Waging Peace.
Fighting Disease.
Building Hope.
Overview

The Carter Center was founded in 1982 by former U.S. President Jimmy Carter and his wife, Rosalynn, in partnership with Emory University, to advance peace and health worldwide. A nongovernmental organization, the Center has helped to improve life for people in more than 80 countries by resolving conflicts; advancing democracy, human rights, and economic opportunity; preventing diseases; improving mental health care; and teaching farmers to increase crop production.

 

Major Accomplishments

  • Leading a coalition that has reduced incidence of Guinea worm disease from an estimated 3.5 million cases in 1986 to fewer than 148 today, making it likely to be the first human disease since smallpox to be eradicated
  • Observing 97 elections in 38 countries to help establish and strengthen democracies
  • Furthering avenues to peace in Ethiopia, Eritrea, Liberia, Sudan, Uganda, the Korean Peninsula, Haiti, Bosnia and Herzegovina, and the Middle East
  • Helping to establish a village-based health care delivery system in thousands of communities in Africa that now have trained health care personnel and volunteers to distribute drugs and provide health education
  • Strengthening international standards for human rights and the voices of individuals defending those rights in their communities worldwide
  • Pioneering new public health approaches to preventing or controlling devastating neglected diseases in Africa and Latin America
  • Advancing efforts to improve mental health care and diminish the stigma against people with mental illnesses.

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