THE CARTER CENTER
Waging Peace.
Fighting Disease.
Building Hope.
Chronology

Timeline of The Carter Center

Founded in 1982 by former U.S. President Jimmy Carter and former First Lady Rosalynn Carter,  the Atlanta-based Carter Center has helped to improve the quality of life for people in more than 70 countries. The Center, in partnership with Emory University, is committed to advancing human rights and alleviating unnecessary human suffering.

Jump To A Year

1998 | 1997 | 1996 | 1995 | 1994 | 1993 | 1992 | 1991 | 1990 


1999

Dec. 3-5: A Carter Center team observes the Mozambique general elections, later commending Mozambicans for completing the electoral process but expressing concern about the transparency of the final vote tabulation.

Nov. 17: Deputy Surgeon General Kenneth Moritsugu presents a preview of the first "U.S. Surgeon General's Report on Mental Health" at the 15th Annual Rosalynn Carter Symposium on Mental Health Policy.

Nov. 12: The Carter Center receives the Medallion Award from the American Society of Landscape Architects.

Oct. 21: The Carter Center receives $30 million from the Lions Clubs International Foundation and the Conrad N. Hilton Foundation for collaborative work during the next five years to develop blindness prevention programs in 15 countries in Latin America, Africa, and the Middle East — an effort that will affect more than 110 million people at risk of contracting trachoma or river blindness.

Oct. 14-16: Former U.S. President Jimmy Carter signs an agreement between The Carter Center and the Malian government to launch a program to control trachoma, the leading cause of preventable blindness in the world.

Oct. 14-16: Former U.S. President Jimmy Carter and former First Lady Rosalynn Carter attend Sasakawa-Global 2000's "The Food Chain in Sub-Saharan Africa" in Mali — a workshop that brings together cabinet-level officials and experts from African countries, agribusiness executives from Europe and the United States, and leaders of international development agencies worldwide to identify ways to develop more effective agricultural distribution systems.

Aug. 19: A Carter Center delegation in Mozambique to observe the voter registration process finds high rates of turnout, especially among women, and reports that both major political parties appear to be satisfied with the process to date.

Aug. 9: President Bill Clinton presents to former President Jimmy Carter and former First Lady Rosalynn Carter the Presidential Medal of Freedom, the highest civilian award in the United States.

July 24: The Carter Center observes the Cherokee Nation's run-off elections.

June 7: The Carter Center and the National Democratic Institute for International Affairs field a team of 100 observers to the Indonesian parliamentary elections.

June 7: The Center is one of three satellite sites for the White House Conference on Mental Health, hosted by U.S. Vice President Al Gore and Tipper Gore.

May 22: The Carter Center observes the Cherokee Nation elections in Oklahoma.

May 14: Nearly 350 consumers, providers, and advocates of mental health care attend the Rosalynn Carter Georgia Mental Health Forum's "Recovery: A Journey for Life" highlighting effective treatment programs.

May 3-5: Current and former heads of state from the Americas gather at The Carter Center to advance efforts to reduce government corruption in the region.

April 21: The Carter Center joins several relief and development agencies to undertake a pilot initiative to boost potato production and improve food security in North Korea.

Feb. 27: A 60-member joint Carter Center and National Democratic Institute of International Affairs delegation observes the presidential elections in Nigeria.

Jan. 5-14: A Carter Center team observes township elections in China. 

Top


1998

Dec. 10: Former U.S. President Jimmy Carter receives the first U.N. Human Rights Prize on the 50th anniversary of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights.

Dec. 6: A Carter Center team of more than 40 delegates observes the Venezuelan presidential election.

Nov. 23: The Carter Center launches a new program on human rights and the media in Liberia, in support of Liberia's efforts to build strong democratic institutions.

Nov. 18-19: Mrs. Carter convenes the 14th Annual Rosalynn Carter Symposium on Mental Health Policy, titled "Promoting Positive and Healthy Behaviors in Children."

Nov. 4-6: Former U.S. President Jimmy Carter meets with officials in Ecuador and Costa Rica to discuss a new Carter Center project to promote transparency in government/business transactions.

Oct. 8: Leaders from non-governmental organizations based in South Asia and Atlanta meet at The Carter Center for a roundtable discussion, "What's Asia Got to Do with U.S.? A South Asia-U.S. Dialogue on Shared Social Challenge."

Sept. 28: The Carter Center receives more than $9 million to help fund the final assault on Guinea worm disease from donors including the World Bank; American Home Products Corporation; and the governments of Japan, Norway, the United Kingdom, and Denmark.

Sept. 23: Burkina Faso President Blaise Compaore meets with former U.S. President Jimmy Carter to discuss African peace initiatives and the Carter Center's disease eradication projects in the country.

Aug. 27: In a new partnership with Emory University and The Carter Center, The Coca-Cola Company donates $1.5 million to provide scholarships for outstanding Latin American students to study at Emory University and a series of high-level conferences at The Carter Center over the next five years to enhance trade and U.S.-Latin America relations.

Aug. 9-13: Chinese officials from the Ministry of Civil Affairs observe U.S.  run-off elections in Georgia.

June 21-July 16: The Carter Center launches a long-term program on village elections in China to help Chinese officials improve the technical and administrative capacity of the government to conduct village elections and standardize election procedures nationwide.

May 15: "Children's Mental Health: Generating Hope Through Shared Responsibility" is the topic of the Rosalynn Carter Georgia Mental Health Forum at The Carter Center.

April 9-10: A Carter Center delegation visits Liberia to discuss with President Charles Taylor and other Liberian leaders Carter Center projects to help strengthen human rights and economic development in the new democracy.

April 6-7: A Carter Center delegation visits Mozambique to discuss with government officials how the Center might help the country prepare a comprehensive national development strategy.

April 3: In an agreement between The Carter Center and the government of Mali, the Center will help the nation complete a comprehensive development plan for international assistance during the nation's critical democratic transition.

March 25: A Carter Center conference, "Securing Democracies in the Americas: Preparing for the Santiago Summit," focuses on the agenda for the April meeting of 34 Western Hemisphere leaders in Santiago, Chile, with particular emphasis on potential arms control measures.

March 22-24: The Carter Center hosts the "Children at Risk/Children of Promise" symposium — co-sponsored by the Interfaith Health Program, the Lutheran Church Missouri Synod, and Wheat Ridge Ministries — to explore ways to meet the needs of children at risk.

March 19: A conference on successful public and private partnerships that assist families in the transition from welfare to work is sponsored by the America Project and held at The Carter Center.

March 13-14: The Carter Center holds a consultation with the Liberian Commission on Human Rights in Monrovia to assist members in establishing a framework for its operation.

March 2-15: A Carter Center delegation observes village elections in China — the fourth such visit by the Center to discuss, observe, or advise the Chinese government on elections.

Feb. 16: The Carter Center undertakes a development project in Albania to help prepare a national development strategy through a broad public participation process that the Center pioneered.

Top 


1997

Dec. 15-20: A 55-member Carter Center delegation observes the parliamentary elections in Jamaica.

Nov. 19-20: The 13th Annual Rosalynn Carter Symposium on Mental Health Policy, titled "Privacy and Confidentiality and the Appropriate Use of Mental Health Information in an Era of Managed Care," convenes at The Carter Center.

Nov. 18: Former U.S. President Jimmy Carter and YKK Corporation President Tadahiro Yoshida establish the Yoshida Scholarship Foundation-Carter Center Research Scholars Program for Japanese students to conduct research at The Carter Center.

Nov. 13: The Carter Center holds a conference on the U.S. role in establishment of an International Criminal Court.

Nov. 10: The Carter Center's Interfaith Health Program establishes a faith and health consortium with five leading U.S. universities to promote development of curriculum, training programs, and "best practices" research to create links between faith and health.

Oct. 22: Georgia Governor Zell Miller proclaims Oct. 22 "Carter Center Day," in recognition of the Carter Center's 15th anniversary.

Sept. 23: The Carter Center holds a forum titled "Should NAFTA be Extended?"

Aug. 23-27: Former U.S. President Jimmy Carter, former First Lady Rosalynn Carter, and Dr. Norman Borlaug travel to Ethiopia to review progress made toward food security in sub-Saharan Africa.

July 24: The Carter Center holds a one-day conference, "Capital Punishment 25 Years After Furman vs. George," co-sponsored by the Southern Center for Human Rights and Emory Law School, attracting 200 legal experts and scholars.

July 19: The Carter Center sends a 40-member team of international observers to witness the national elections in Liberia.

July 11: The Carter Center and the World Federation for Mental Health convene a meeting of the Committee of International Women Leaders for Mental Health in Helsinki, Finland, at which at least 17 countries are represented.

July 6: The Carter Center sponsors a study mission to the July 6 elections in Mexico to assess the implementation of recent electoral reforms, especially mechanisms for resolving postelectoral grievances.

June 15: Dr. Robert Pastor, director of the Latin American and Caribbean Program, witnesses the release of 60 Colombian soldiers and 10 marines captured by the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia nine months ago.

May 22: The Atlanta Project announces approval of seven new lottery-funded pre-kindergarten programs to serve children in the TAP geographical area.

April 28-29: More than 20 current and former heads of state from the Americas meet at The Carter Center to assess hemispheric relations and offer recommendations on key issues, including free trade, drug certification policy, arms sales, and boundary disputes.

April 17: Former U.S. President Jimmy Carter and former First Lady Rosalynn Carter travel to Sudan and other countries in East Africa to discuss health activities and recent peace initiatives among some of Sudan's major parties.

April 9: The Carter Center establishes the Rosalynn Carter Fellowships for Mental Health Journalism as part of its national effort to reduce stigma and discrimination against people with mental illnesses.

April 1: The Carter Center expands its efforts to prevent gun-related deaths and injuries to children by establishing a demonstration site in Atlanta.

March 9-10: The Interfaith Health Program convenes 100 leaders of religious foundations, faith groups, and the health care field to explore community-based approaches to prevention and health care.

March 5: Former U.S. President Jimmy Carter and Palestinian leader Yasser Arafat meet in Plains, Ga.

March 5-16: A Carter Center delegation observes village elections in China.

Feb. 19-21: The Carter Center and the World Bank co-sponsor a regional workshop, "The Transition from War to Peace," with Guatemala and Liberia serving as case studies.

Feb. 9: Uganda President Yoweri Museveni meets with former U.S. President Jimmy Carter at The Carter Center to discuss recent conflict and refugee movement in the Great Lakes region of Africa.

Jan. 30: With assistance from the Global 2000 Program and Sasakawa Africa Association, Ethiopia becomes a food exporter for the first time.

Jan. 27-28: The Carter Center's America Project sponsors a conference on the polarizing effect of urban sprawl.

Jan. 24: The Guinea Worm Eradication Program reaches a major milestone when Pakistan is certified by the World Health Organization as having eliminated Guinea worm disease (dracunculiasis).

Jan. 15-26: Former U.S. President Jimmy Carter, on behalf of The Carter Center, visits Argentina, Brazil, Chile, and Jamaica to consult with leaders in preparation for an April 1997 consultation at The Carter Center titled "The 21st Century Agenda for the Americas."

Jan. 1: The Atlanta Project enters its second phase of operation with a focus on the well-being of children and families, including projects in four areas: after-school programs in middle schools, welfare-to-work, pre- kindergarten, and family health clinics.

Top


1996

Nov. 20-21: The Carter Center's 12th Annual Rosalynn Carter Symposium on Mental Health Policy addresses how employers' decisions regarding mental health policies affect businesses, employees, families, and communities.

Oct. 20: A delegation from the Carter Center's Council of Freely Elected Heads of Government monitors the Nicaraguan elections.

June 27-30: A delegation of the Council of Freely Elected Heads of Government travels to the Dominican Republic to observe the second-round presidential elections.

June 10: Former U.S. President Jimmy Carter and former First Lady Rosalynn Carter introduce "America's Youth Passport," an innovative booklet introduced by The Atlanta Project for parents to record health information about their children.

June 7-11: A delegation of the Council of Freely Elected Heads of Government travels to Nicaragua to observe preparations for the Oct. 20 presidential elections.

June 4-11: The Carter Center sends a team of agricultural experts to North Korea to assess the agricultural situation and discuss prospects of increasing long-term grain production.

May 12-18: An international delegation organized by the Carter Center-based Council of Freely Elected Heads of Government observes presidential elections in the Dominican Republic.

April 30: The Carter Center establishes the River Blindness Program to enable the Center to expand its efforts to fight the disease.

April 24-26: A Carter Center mission observes preparations for the May 16 presidential elections in the Dominican Republic.

April 23: Former U.S. President Jimmy Carter meets with Guyana President Cheddi Jagan to discuss implementation of Guyana's new comprehensive long-term development strategy.

March 16-18: The Carter Center organizes a second Great Lakes heads-of-state summit in Tunisia to promote repatriation of Rwandan refugees and reduce violence in Burundi.

Jan. 18-21: A 40-member delegation from 11 countries observes the Palestinian elections. 

Top


1995

Dec. 4: A press conference and luncheon is held in Washington, D.C., to announce 97 percent eradication of Guinea worm disease.

Nov. 28-Dec. 2: President Carter convenes a summit in Cairo, Egypt, of heads of state from Burundi, Rwanda, Tanzania, Uganda, and Zaire to examine ways to begin an orderly and safe return of Rwandan refugees; stop the cycle of violence in Burundi; and promote peace, reconciliation, and justice in the region.

Nov. 18-21: President and Mrs. Carter travel to Uganda, Rwanda, Burundi, and Zaire on a fact-finding mission to prepare for a heads-of-state summit on crises in the Great Lakes region of Africa.

Oct. 27: The 11th Annual Rosalynn Carter Symposium on Mental Health Policy is held at The Carter Center, on the topic of managing care in the public interest.

Oct. 2: The Rosalynn Carter Georgia Mental Health Forum is held at The Carter Center.

Sept. 24-28: Former President Jimmy Carter and former First Lady Rosalynn Carter meet with heads of state in Kenya, Uganda, and Ethiopia to discuss regional peace initiatives and agricultural projects on behalf of The Carter Center.

May 25: Former U.S. President Jimmy Carter negotiates a two-month extension of the Sudanese cease-fire.

March 30: Former U.S. President Jimmy Carter negotiates a two-month cease-fire in Sudan, for The Carter Center and others to initiate efforts to eradicate Guinea worm disease, prevent river blindness, and immunize children against polio and other diseases.

Feb. 23-26: Former U.S. President Jimmy Carter, former First Lady Rosalynn Carter, former Prime Minister of Belize George Price, U.S. Senator Sam Nunn, and former Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff Gen. Colin Powell travel to Haiti in response to an invitation from Haiti President Jean-Bertrand Aristide.

Jan. 1: The America Project is launched to share with other cities strategies for urban revitalization developed by The Atlanta Project.

Top 


1994

Dec. 17-21: A Carter Center mission to the former Yugoslavia to facilitate talks among warring Bosnian Muslims and Serbs produces a four-month cease-fire and the resumption of talks on a comprehensive peace under the auspices of the five-nation Contact Group.

Dec. 4-5: Former U.S. President Jimmy Carter convenes the first meeting of the Carter Center's International Human Rights Council, a body of activists and leaders charged with providing new visibility and strategies advancing human rights worldwide.

Nov. 7: The Carter Center establishes the "Not Even One" initiative to combat child deaths by firearms.

Nov. 2-3: U.S. Surgeon General Dr. Joycelyn Elders joins nearly 400 representatives of education, health care, social service, government, and mental health organizations to promote greater collaboration in addressing adolescent substance abuse, violence, and mental health at the 10th Annual Rosalynn Carter Symposium on Mental Health Policy.

Sept. 28: The Carter Center opens an office in Georgetown, Guyana, to support the country's efforts for economic development, electoral reform, and preservation of the environment.

Sept. 17-18: Former U.S. President Jimmy Carter heads a mission to Haiti with former Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff Gen. Colin Powell and U.S. Senator Sam Nunn, at the request of President Clinton, to negotiate terms of departure for Haiti's de facto leaders, averting a U.S.-led multinational invasion and resulting in a signed agreement for the peaceful removal of the officers from power.

Sept. 1: The Carter Center — remaining a uniquely autonomous organization — partners with Emory University, with programs and budgets overseen by a new 22-member board of trustees co-chaired by former U.S. President Jimmy Carter and former First Lady Rosalynn Carter.

Aug. 17-24: Members of the Carter Center-based Council of Freely Elected Heads of Government observe presidential elections in Mexico.

June 12-18: Former U.S. President Jimmy Carter negotiates terms for the first dialogue in 40 years between the United States and North Korea.

May 18: The Carter Center presents the Carter-Menil Human Rights Prize to the people of Norway in a special ceremony in Oslo.

May 8: Former U.S. President Jimmy Carter and members of the Carter Center-based Council of Freely Elected Heads of Government monitor presidential elections in Panama.

March 7-8: Former U.S. first ladies Rosalynn Carter and Betty Ford testify before Congress and support the finding of a Bazelon Center for Mental Health Law study to encourage inclusion of mental health and substance abuse benefits in the national health care reform plan.

Jan. 23-25: The Carter Center's Interfaith Health Conference hosts leaders from faith groups and public health agencies to examine new partnerships in health care.

Top

 
1993

Nov. 18-19: The Carter Center-sponsored Commission on Radio and Television Policy, co-chaired by President Carter, convenes heads of U.S. and post-Soviet Union television networks to explore new economic ties and co-production ventures.

Nov. 15-16: The Carter Center hosts the Ninth Annual Rosalynn Carter Mental Health Symposium, "Mental Health in Health Care Reform — How to Assure Access to and Quality of Services."

Oct. 25-Oct. 29: The Carter Center hosts representatives of the Sudan People's Liberation Army-United for peace talks.

Oct. 6-Dec. 1: Six Liberian community leaders begin work in the African Governance Program's Mickey Leland Fellowship program.

July 28-Aug. 8: Former U.S. President Jimmy Carter and former First Lady Rosalynn Carter travel to Benin, Togo, Ethiopia, Kenya, Uganda, and Sudan to advance Carter Center efforts to increase agriculture production, eradicate Guinea worm disease, and promote democracy in Africa.

May 9: The Carter Center-based Council of Freely Elected Heads of Government monitors elections in Paraguay.

May 5: Gladys Knight hosts Kids' Celebration at the Omni with Michael Jackson as special guest at a program for children and volunteers who participated in the Atlanta Project's immunization initiative.

April 24-May 1: Free vaccinations are provided for children in the Carter Center's Atlanta Project clusters.

Jan. 1: Dr. John Hardman is appointed executive director of The Carter Center.  

Top
 

1992

Dec. 10: The seventh annual Carter-Menil Human Rights Prize is awarded to the Haitian Refugee Center and the Native American Rights Fund.

Nov. 19: The Carter Center hosts the Eighth Annual Rosalynn Carter Symposium on Mental Health Policy, "Mental Health in Healthcare Reform."

Oct. 5: The Carter Center-based Council of Freely Elected Heads of Government observes presidential elections in Guyana.

Sept. 18: A new Carter Center initiative, the Interfaith Health Program, aims to assist faith groups in reaching disadvantaged populations with health care information.

Sept. 2-8: Former U.S. President Jimmy Carter and former First Lady Rosalynn Carter visit Benin, Burkina Faso, Mali, Niger, and Togo in Francophone Africa to urge the eradication of Guinea worm disease.

Aug. 23-25: The Carter Center sponsors "Workshop 1992: Agricultural Development in Policy Options for Sub-Saharan Africa."

July 12: The Carter Center-based Council of Freely Elected Heads of Government sends a delegation to observe Mexican regional elections in Michoacan and Chihuahua.

July 6-7: International human rights representatives attend a Carter Center-sponsored seminar, "Investigating Abuses and Introducing Human Rights Safeguards in the Democratization Process."

June 11-12: The Carter Center's African Governance Program hosts the conference, "The New Africa: Democracy, Growth, and Business Opportunities in Zambia."

Jan. 15-17: At the first annual meeting, the Carter Center's International Negotiation Network hosts experts worldwide to review the state of eight civil conflicts.

Top
 

1991

Dec. 8: The sixth annual Carter-Menil Human Rights Prize is awarded to the University of Central America in El Salvador to honor six Jesuit priests murdered there.

Nov. 21: The Carter Center hosts the Seventh Annual Rosalynn Carter Symposium on Mental Health Policy, "The Relationship between Physical and Mental Health: Closing the Gaps."

Nov. 16: The Carter Center hosts the first annual meeting of the Commission on Television Policy, chaired by former U.S. President Jimmy Carter and Moscow Independent Broadcasting Corporation President Eduard Sagalaev.

Oct. 31: The Carter Center leads an international delegation observing elections in Zambia.

Oct. 25: Former U.S. President Jimmy Carter announces the formation of The Atlanta Project, a major domestic initiative to tackle inner-city social problems, sponsored by The Carter Center.

Sept. 4: The Carter Center's Mental Health Task Force is formed under the direction of former First Lady Rosalynn Carter.

April 23: The Mickey Leland Community Development Fellowships are established at the Carter Center of Emory University's African Governance Program.

April 13-15: The Carter Center's Global 2000 Program trains special education teachers and develops a modern prosthesis delivery system in Beijing, China.

March 22: The Carter Center's International Negotiation Network is invited to assist in the Liberian peace process.
 
Top
 

1990

Dec. 16: The Carter Center's Council of Freely Elected Heads of Government observes Haiti's first free and fair democratic national elections.

Sept. 17: Former U.S. President Jimmy Carter moderates a Carter Center conference, "A Crisis in the Gulf," a production of the Discovery Channel on the Middle East.

May 16: The Carter Center's Council of Freely Elected Heads of Government observes elections in the Dominican Republic.

Feb. 23-28: The Carter Center's Council of Freely Elected Heads of Government observes Nicaragua's presidential election, in which Chamorro defeated incumbent Daniel Ortega to become that country's new president.

Top


 

Sign Up for Email Updates

Thanks for Signing Up!

Please leave this field empty

Thanks for Staying Updated!

Now, we invite you to Get Involved
Multimedia

Building Hope: An overview of the work of The Carter Center
Watch Video >>