Activities By Country

Nigeria

Millions will be spared future suffering thanks to collaborative efforts of The Carter Center and Nigeria's Federal Ministry of Health to address widespread neglected diseases such as Guinea worm, lymphatic filariasis, schistosomiasis, river blindness, trachoma, and malaria. The Center also has assisted efforts to build democracy and peace in this nation.

 

Waging Peace

Since its independence from Great Britain in 1960 until its historic presidential election in 1999, Nigeria was under military rule for all but 10 years. For three decades, the country suffered from unfettered corruption and ethnic violence. After the death of dictator General Sani Abacha in June 1998, General Abdulsalami Abubakar rose to power and instituted democratic reforms. He legalized political parties, political prisoners were released, and the press operated unhindered. The Carter Center was invited to observe elections called for February 1999.

Read full text on the Carter Center's peace work in Nigeria >

 

Fighting Disease

Africa's most populous nation, Nigeria has one of the highest burdens of disease on the continent. In 1988, the government of Nigeria invited The Carter Center to begin Guinea worm eradication programming in the nation. Subsequently, The Carter Center established six more health programs in Nigeria.

Read full text on the Carter Center's health work in Nigeria >

 

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Map of Nigeria


QUICK FACTS: NIGERIA


Size: 923,768 square kilometers

Population: 174,507,539

Population below poverty line: 70 percent

Life expectancy: 52 years

Ethnic groups: Of more than 250 ethnic groups; the most populous and politically influential are Hausa and Fulani, Yoruba, Igbo (Ibo), Ijaw, Kanuri, Ibibio, Tiv

Religions: Muslim, Christian, indigenous beliefs

Languages: English (official), Hausa, Yoruba, Igbo (Ibo), Fulani, over 500 additional indigenous languages

 

(Source: U.S. Central Intelligence Agency World Factbook 2013)


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