Feature Stories
Feature Stories

Former U.S. President Jimmy Carter and Carter Center Delegation Tour Hispaniola to Support Elimination of Malaria and Lymphatic Filariasis from Caribbean

Oct. 8, 2009


Efforts to eliminate malaria and lymphatic filariasis from the Caribbean island of Hispaniola were underscored Oct. 7-8 during a visit by former U.S. President Jimmy Carter and a Carter Center delegation. 

Haiti and the Dominican Republic have launched a binational plan, as part of a Carter Center-sponsored pilot project, to wipe out these devastating diseases from their last reservoir in the Caribbean islands.

In addition to President Carter, the Carter Center delegation's visit--meant to stimulate international support--included former First Lady Rosalynn Carter,  Carter Center President and CEO Dr. John Hardman, Vice President of Health Programs Dr. Donald Hopkins, and
Malaria Control Program Director Dr. Frank Richards.

President Carter, joined by leaders from the Bi-National Malaria and Lymphatic Filariasis Project and Carter Center experts, held a press conference Oct. 8 with Dominican and foreign press in Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic.

Read coverage, and view photos, below:


Carter promueve un plan contra malaria (Listin Diario, en Español) >


Haïti-Rép. Dominicaine : Carter applaudit la bonne disposition des deux pays à lutter contre la malaria et la filariose (Alter Presse) >


Carter Center Works to Eradicate Malaria in Haiti, Dominican Republic

 


Carter Center Photos/P.DiCampo

Former U.S. President Jimmy Carter (center), Dr. Bautista Rojas Gomez (left), and Dr. Jose Manuel Puello Montero speak to Dominican and foreign press about malaria issues in Dominican Republic and Haiti during an Oct. 8 press conference at the Hilton Hotel in Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic.  President Carter visited Dominican Republic and Haiti to highlight the fight against malaria and The Bi-National Malaria and Lymphatic Filariasis Program.



Dominican President Dr. Leonel Fernandez welcomes former U.S. President Jimmy Carter and former First Lady Rosalynn Carter to the Presidential Palace Oct. 8 in Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic. 




Former U.S. President Jimmy Carter,  joined by Carter Center experts, speaks to Dominican and foreign press Oct. 8 about malaria in Dominican Republic and Haiti at the Presidential Palace in Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic.

 

 


The Dominican Republic and Haiti have increased malaria surveillance and treatment as part of a Carter Center-sponsored pilot project to encourage the two nations to cooperate to rid malaria and lymphatic filariasis from the island they share.  Above, on Oct. 7 in Dajabon, Dominican Republic, Dr. David Joa (right) of The Bi-National Malaria and Lymphatic Filariasis Project, shows former U.S. President Jimmy Carter, former First Lady Rosalynn Carter, and Carter Center Health Programs Vice President Dr. Donald Hopkins a map that illustrates a reduction in malaria cases.




Photo:  J. Augustin

Former U.S. President Jimmy Carter and former First Lady Rosalynn Carter meet Oct. 8 with Haitian President René Préval at the presidential palace in Port-au-Prince.




Carter Center Photo/F. Richards

Former U.S. President Jimmy Carter (center), Dr. Alex Larson (left), and Dr. Vély Jean-François (far left) join other Haitian health officials during a meeting on Oct. 8 in Port-au-Prince Haiti to discuss malaria and lymphatic filariasis issues on the island of Hispaniola and the binational work being conducted to eliminate these two diseases from the Dominican Republic and Haiti.






Haitian health worker Jonel Mompremier pricks the finger of a young child to test his blood for malaria parasites in Ouanaminthe, Haiti, on Oct. 6. The efforts of The Bi-National Malaria and Lymphatic Filariasis Project have increased malaria surveillance and treatment in both Dominican Republic and Haiti. "The most important thing we can do is eliminate malaria," Mompremier says. "I'm happy to contribute to the solution."





Former First Lady Rosalynn Carter holds a feverish child after the child was tested for malaria during a visit to Centre Medico-Socialde in Ouanaminthe, Haiti, on Oct. 7. Looking on (from left) are Carter Center Health Programs Vice President Dr. Donald Hopkins, Carter Center President and CEO Dr. John Hardman, Dr. Joanel Mondestin, and Former U.S. President Jimmy Carter.

 

 

 

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