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Guinea Worm Eradication Program – In The News

 

Sept. 9, 2014
This Endangered Species Deserves to Die a Painful Death
Published by Good Magazine.
As of the end of July, global health organizations had reported 53 new cases of guinea worm disease around the world. As many folks don't know much about guinea worm, 53 might seem like a pretty scant number — it could equally signify outbreak or containment. But what that number indicates is actually tantamount to a revolution in healthcare. In 1986, health officials estimated that there were 3.5 million new cases of guinea worm disease annually across 20 countries. That means in just under three decades, we've eliminated more than 99 percent of cases, and restricted it to the most remote and troubled regions of four African countries: Chad, Ethiopia, Mali, and South Sudan.

 

Aug.11, 2014
Lessons From the Low-Tech Defeat of the Guinea Worm
Published by The New York Times Blog
Given all the talk about the hepatitis C drug Sovaldi in recent weeks, as well as the high prices on many other recent innovations, you might think that we're entering a time when leaps forward happen only at great cost. That misses the point. It also strengthens the false notion that we can move forward only through advances in technology.

 

July 22, 2014
Guinea Worm is Almost Eradicated, in One of the Biggest Public Health Wins Ever
Published by Vox.com.
It's been decades in the making, but we may finally be close to eradicating the guinea worm, a nonfatal but debilitating parasitic infection that affected millions of people as recently as the 1980s. NPR's Michaeleen Doucleff reports that the Carter Center, the NGO that has lead the charge to eradicate guinea worm, has counted only 17 cases of the disease in the first five months of this year, compared to 68 in the equivalent time period last year.

 

July 8, 2014
Going Going, Almost Gone: A Worm Verges on Extinction 
Published by NPR's Goats and Soda blog.
Guinea worm is about as close to a real-life Alien event as you can get — a parasitic worm mates inside a person's abdomen, grows up to 3 feet long and then exits (painfully) from a blister. But the worm's final chapter is near: The world is closer than ever to wiping the parasite off the face of the Earth. There were only 17 cases of Guinea worm in the first five months of this year, the Carter Center reported Monday. That's a 75 percent reduction from this time last year, when 68 people reported infections.

 

June 12, 2014
City of Chicago Honorary Resolution for Dr. Donald R. Hopkins
City of Chicago
On Wednesday, May 28, 2014, Alderman Michele Smith honored Dr. Hopkins with a resolution from the City of Chicago commending him for his work in health, including Guinea worm eradication. 

 

May 14, 2014
Peer Pressure Can Be a Lifesaver
Published by New York Times Fixes blog.
The only way to prevent Guinea worm disease is to convince people to stop drinking contaminated water. Health workers figured out part of that challenge when they devised an inexpensive, cloth pipe filter that they distributed free throughout Sudan and other parts of Africa. But they struck epidemiological gold with a simple behavioral tweak: adding nylon cords to the pipes, so that people could wear them around their necks. Volunteers spread the message that contaminating water is an unneighborly act. Local leaders began wearing the filters, which over time became a symbol of good judgment and respect for the community's health, according to Dr. Donald Hopkins, the vice president of health programs at The Carter Center. Based in part on these efforts, Guinea worm disease is close to being eradicated.

 

May 11, 2014
Lifelines: How to Slay a Dragon
Published by Al Jazeera English: Lifelines – The Quest for Global Health.
At the end of 2013, the Carter Center reported only 148 cases of Guinea worm worldwide. This is down from an estimated 3.5 million cases in 1986. There is no cure or vaccine. Rather the dramatic reduction in Guinea worm cases is due to behavioral changes. Former US President Jimmy Carter has devoted his philanthropic organization's resources to eliminating this disease, and he speaks of his desire to see the last few cases banished from the world in his own lifetime. Smallpox is the only human disease in history to be successfully eradicated. Could Guinea worm be the next?
Related: Lifelines – The Quest for Global Health also profiled the Center's
River Blindness Elimination Program and Trachoma Control Program.

 

May 9, 2014
Hunting the "Fiery Serpent": The Quest to Wipe Out Guinea Worm
Published by CNN – Vital Signs.
Guinea worm, sometimes known as the "fiery serpent," is not on the radar of most Western governments, especially with so few cases remaining worldwide causing the "cost per case" to increase dramatically. Dr. Ernesto Ruiz-Tiben, who directs the Carter Center's program, is determined to find these cases and remove the disease from our planet once and for all. "We'll be standing until the last worm goes," he concludes. "As communities learn about the worm and its life cycle, they discover that they can get rid of it by themselves. We give them the lessons, but they do the work," says Ruiz-Tiben. "That's why it can be eradicated worldwide."

 

May 9, 2014
Dracunculiasis Eradication – Global Surveillance Summary, 2013 (PDF)
Published in Weekly Epidemiological Record, No. 19, 2014, 89, 189–204. © World Health Organization.
This report summarizes the progress made toward eradicating Guinea worm disease through the end of 2013.

 

May 8, 2014
La Côte d'Ivoire rejoint la liste des 198 pays et territoires déclarés exempt de ver de Guinée
Published by the World Health Organization.
La Côte d'Ivoire a reçu officiellement, le 08 mai 2014, ses lettres de certification pour l'éradication du ver de Guinée (dracunculose). Le Représentant de l'OMS en Côte d'Ivoire, Dr Allarangar Yokouidé, a, à l'occasion d'une cérémonie solennelle organisée au Cabinet du Ministre de la Santé et de la lutte contre le sida, remis à Madame la Ministre, Dr Raymonde Goudou Coffie, les deux lettres. L'une est signée par la Directrice Générale de l'OMS, Dr Margaret Chan, et l'autre est signée par le Directeur Régional de l'OMS pour l'Afrique, Dr Luis Gomes Sambo. Aux partenaires, notamment l'OMS, l'UNICEF, le Centre Carter, MAP international et le CDC Atlanta, elle a adressé ses vifs remerciements et toute la gratitude du gouvernement pour les appuis apportés au cours de la longue période de lutte contre cette maladie.

 

April 11, 2014
¿Cómo erradicar una enfermedad sin vacunas ni fármacos?
Published by BBC Mundo.
Cuando en 1986 iniciamos la campaña de erradicación del gusano de Guinea, este parásito afectaba a unas 3,5 millones de personas en 21 países de África y Asia. Hoy en día hemos reducido la enfermedad a 148 casos en cuatro países africanos. No ha sido fácil, pues para esta infección no hay medicamentos ni vacunas. La prevención es la única forma de evitar la transmisión.

 

April 4, 2014
Carter Center Marks Progress in Fight Against Guinea Worm, River Blindness
Published by Voice of America.
Guinea worm disease and river blindness are among 17 tropical diseases the World Health Organization considers neglected. Thanks to the efforts of the Atlanta-based Carter Center — founded by former president Jimmy Carter and his wife Rosalynn — focused treatment and prevention are leading to the elimination of one, and the extinction of another.

 

April 2, 2014
National Review Meeting Held on Guinea Worm Eradication Program
Published by the Ethiopian Public Health Institute.
The Ethiopian Public Health Institute, EPHI has conducted a National Review Meeting on the Ethiopian Dracunculiasis Eradication program that was held from March 17 to 18, 2014, at Wabishebelle hotel, Addis Ababa. Dr. Zerihun Tadesse, representative of the Carter Center, in his keynote speech said that, "on behalf of the Carter Center I would like to express our renewed commitment to further strengthen our support to the Government of Ethiopia in its fight against Guinea Worm Eradication program at this last chapter."

 

March 31, 2014
Celebrating Nigeria's Guinea Worm Free Status
Published by the News Agency of Nigeria.
The World Health Organisation (WHO), recently certified Nigeria as a Guinea Worm Disease (GWD) free country. Former Head of State Yakubu Gowon, said that when former U.S. President Jimmy Carter asked him to join in the fight against GWD, he did not hesitate as he felt a sense of duty to join the campaign. "When Carter asked me to join him, and I learnt there were  about 800,000 cases of GWD in Nigeria during my time, and I did not do anything, my conscience was pricked. I said to myself, I must do anything this team wants me to do to ensure the eradication of this debilitating disease."

 

March 19, 2014
Ethiopia Poised to Interrupt Transmission of Guinea Worm Disease in 2014 (PDF)
Published by the World Health Organization.
After more than 30 years of continuous struggle, only 148 cases of Guinea worm disease were reported globally in 2013. Today, there are only four endemic countries: Chad, Ethiopia, Mali and South Sudan. Three cases were reported across the border of South Sudan in Sudan in 2013, where the last indigenous case was recorded in 2002. "The determination of the endemic countries and support from The Carter Center, UNICEF and other local partners have been crucial," said Dr Gautam Biswas, Team Leader of WHO's Dracunculiasis Eradication Unit."

 

March 17, 2014
Nigeria's Great Achievement: Guinea Worm Free
Published by The Global Dispatch.
The World Health Organization (WHO) presented certificates  to five African countries today indicating their new guinea-worm free status–Somalia, Cote d'Ivoire, South Africa, Niger and Nigeria. Congratulations to all. I would like to focus on the great achievement of Nigeria. In 1986, the disease afflicted an estimated 3.5 million people a year in 21 countries in Africa and Asia. From that 3.5 million cases in 1986, provisional numbers for 2013 reveal a mere 148 cases in four countries in 2013, a 99.9 percent decrease!

 

Jan. 30, 2014
Guinea Worm: Lethal Plague Finally Bids Nigeria Farewell
Published by The Nigerian Tribune.
For more than three decades, Nigeria had grappled with the guinea worm menace, earning the dubious title of the most endemic country at a time.  It was lagging behind compared with countries like Niger, Mali, Burkina Faso, Ethiopia and a host of others.

 

Jan. 25, 2014
Good Riddance – A Nasty Disease is About to be History
Published by The Economist.
Dracunculiasis is almost gone. According to a report published on January 16th by the Carter Centre, an American charity, only 148 people now harbour Guinea worm, which causes it. Dracunculiasis is rarely fatal, but it is debilitating. So in 1986 the Carter Centre organised a campaign, which it still leads, to eradicate it. This is possible because humans are the only vertebrate host. The worm's life cycle can thus be interrupted by identifying those infested, and stopping the worm breaking up as it emerges from them. That, plus cleaning up the water, has reduced the number of cases from 900,000 in 20 countries, in 1989, to today's handful. Most (113) are in South Sudan, with isolated others in Chad, Ethiopia and Mali.

 

Jan. 17, 2014
Guinea Worm Eradication at Risk in South Sudanese War
Published by Science Magazine. Subscription required to read the full article.
By Martin Enserink. Next week, former U.S. President Jimmy Carter was scheduled to travel to the South Sudanese capital Juba and announce that the world is now closer than ever to eradicating guinea worm disease. In all of 2013, only 149 people, in just four African countries, suffered from the painful, debilitating infection, according to the provisional figures that Carter was due to announce. South Sudan, an impoverished country that split off from Sudan in 2011 after decades of civil war, is the main remaining stronghold, with 114 cases; but even that number is down 78% compared with 2012. But now that progress is in peril. In December, violence erupted between rebels and the South Sudanese government, leading the Carter Center in Atlanta, in charge of the 3-decade fight against the guinea worm, to evacuate its expat staff of more than 30 people and cancel the Juba meeting.

 

Jan. 16, 2014
Guinea Worm Said to Infect Few in 2013
Published by The New York Times.
By Donald McNeil Jr. Only 148 cases of Guinea worm disease were found in the world in 2013, a 73 percent drop from the 542 cases found one year earlier, the Carter Center announced Thursday. Along with polio, Guinea worm is one of two diseases hovering on the brink of extinction, with fewer than 1,000 cases annually worldwide. When the Carter Center began its campaign in 1986, there were an estimated 3.5 million annual Guinea worm infections across Africa and Asia.

 

Jan. 16, 2014
Jimmy Carter Announces Guinea Worm Disease on the Brink of Eradication (Video)
Published by The Huffington Post.
A painful and debilitating disease which dates back to ancient times is on the brink of eradication, former President Jimmy Carter announced on HuffPost Live Thursday. The latest provisional numbers for cases of Guinea worm disease have reached a historic low of 148 people worldwide in 2013. President Carter and First Lady Rosalynn Carter founded the Carter Center in 1982 and in the mid-80s began an international campaign to target Guinea worm disease. In 1986, the number of cases was estimated to be 3.5 million, in 21 countries throughout Africa and Asia. By 2012, the number had been reduced by 99.9 percent with 542 cases reported in four endemic nations.
The full interview with President Carter is available here >

 

Jan. 16, 2014 
The World's Youngest Country and a Very Old Disease: South Sudan Proves Guinea Worm Can Be Defeated With Return To Peace
Published by The Huffington Post.
By Carter Center Vice President Donald R. Hopkins.
In the 1970s, a decade of peace opened up between civil wars in Sudan, allowing health workers to reach and immunize at-risk communities for smallpox. Without this window of peace, historians argue, smallpox might not have been conquered there. Recent outbreaks of violence (Dec. 15, 2013) in the new country of South Sudan have led some to speculate whether eradication efforts will succeed for another primeval plague -- the Bible's "fiery serpent," known today as Guinea worm disease (dracunculiasis).

 

Jan. 16, 2014
From Millions of Cases to 148: Guinea Worm's Days Are Numbered
Published by NPR's Shots blog.
By Michaeleen Doucleff
Guinea worm, pack your bags. The world recorded only 148 cases of Guinea worm last year, the Carter Center said Thursday. That's nearly three-quarters less than in 2012, and a tiny fraction compared to the 3.5 million cases back in 1986."That's very exciting because the number of cases at the end of 2013 are much lower than they were in 2012," says Ernesto Ruiz-Tiben, who directs the Guinea worm eradication efforts at the Carter Center.

 

Jan. 16, 2014
For The First Time Since 1979, The World Is On The Verge Of Eradicating An Infectious Disease
Published by Think Progress.
During an appearance on HuffPost Live on Thursday, former U.S. President Jimmy Carter announced major progress in the fight to eradicate Guinea worm. Worldwide reported cases were cut in half to 542 in 2012 and provisional data indicate there were just 148 cases reported in 2013, with the vast majority occurring in the war-torn nation of South Sudan. "This is the first time since 1979 that we're on the verge of eradicating a disease," said Carter. The global eradication campaign now moves to its final and most difficult stage, setting up Guinea worm to become the only disease other than small pox to be eradicated worldwide and the first disease to be eliminated entirely without the use of vaccines or medication. 

 

Jan. 16, 2014
Guinea Worm Being Eradicated Worldwide – Carter Centre
Published by Premium Times (Nigeria).
The Carter Centre, an international guinea worm eradication campaign, has disclosed that there were only 148 recorded cases of guinea worm in the world in 2013.The Carter Centre leads the international Guinea worm eradication campaign and works in close partnership with national programs, the World Health Organization, WHO; U.S. Centre for Disease Control and Prevention, CDC; and UNICEF. However, WHO is the only organization that can officially certify the eradication of a disease. The WHO has certified Nigeria a guinea worm free country with the certificate presented to President Goodluck Jonathan on Wednesday.

 

Jan. 16, 2014
El primer animal que va a ser aniquilado a propósito pasa de infectar a millones a sólo 148
Published by Materia.
By Manuel Ansede.
La campaña de erradicación del espantoso gusano de Guinea acorrala al parásito, que hace tres décadas afectaba a 3,5 millones de personas cada año, en un puñado de aldeas de África. El Centro Carter, la organización sin ánimo de lucro fundada por el expresidente de EEUU Jimmy Carter, ha anunciado hoy que en 2013 sólo se registraron 148 casos de personas infectadas por el parásito. Es una caída del 73% respecto a los 542 casos de 2012 y del 99,9999% respecto a hace tres décadas, cuando el gusano devoraba las entrañas de 3,5 millones de personas cada año, en su mayoría niños, en una veintena de países en África y Asia. Como el gusano necesita a un ser humano en su ciclo de vida, si se evita la infección, el animal desaparece.

 

Jan. 9, 2014
The Sudan Conflict and Disease
Donald R. Hopkins letter to the editor, as published by The New York Times.
"U.S. Is Facing Hard Choices in South Sudan" (front page, Jan. 4) reports that the conflict there "has left the Obama administration scrambling to prevent the unraveling of a major American achievement in Africa." The conflict also jeopardizes an important South Sudanese achievement, which aims to eliminate Guinea worm disease from the young country by the end of this year, with significant benefits to health, agricultural productivity and school attendance.

 

Dec. 18, 2013
Guinea Worm Cases Declining
Published by The Journal of the American Medical Association.
If current trends continue, reported cases of dracunculiasis, commonly called Guinea worm, could reach a historic low in 2013. Recent data show that in countries where dracunculiasis is endemic, cases decreased by 77%, from 393 during January to June 2012 to 89 during the first 6 months of this year. Based on reports from last year, when three-fourths of all cases occurred from January to June, health officials expect that fewer than 150 will be reported by the end of this year.

 

Nov. 14, 2013
The Patron Saint of Peanut Allergies
Published by Slate.com.
President Barack Obama signed a bill this week that encourages schools to be prepared to administer life-saving doses of epinephrine to students in the throes of severe allergic reactions. Kudos, Mr. President, on a great first step. But given that an estimated 8 percent of American kids have food allergies, I can't be alone in wishing yesterday will be merely a preview to the main event. Perhaps Obama could find a guide in President Jimmy Carter. Malia, if you're still reading, find your father's Rolodex and invite President Carter over for a peanut-free dinner…get him talking about dracunculiasis, also known as guinea worm disease.

 

Nov. 5, 2013
Jimmy Carter Fights to Eradicate Diseases
Published by ABC's "Good Morning America."
The former president's passion project, The Carter Center, helps get medicine to some of the most remote locations in the world. President Carter was in New York to attend a celebration at Pfizer Headquarters on November 5th to honor the 15th anniversary of the International Trachoma Initiative.

 

Oct. 30, 2013
The Art of Eradication
Published by Harvard Public Health magazine.
In the early 1980s Guinea worm disease struck millions from western India to Senegal. Now, as a result of the Carter Center's efforts, Guinea worm disease has fallen from 3.5 million cases in 1986 to fewer than 600 cases globally in 2012. In 2013, the number is expected to be even lower. The Harvard School of Public Health highlights the contributions of alumnus Carter Center Vice President Donald Hopkins who oversees all of the Center's health programs.

 

Oct. 24, 2013
Slaying "Little Dragons": Guinea Worm Moves Toward Eradication
Published by the NPR blog "Shots." Reposted by more than 175 outlets.
The world has eradicated just one human disease: smallpox. But another illness is getting tantalizingly close to elimination. A report Thursday puts a parasitic worm ahead of polio in the race to extinction. The world recorded just 89 cases of Guinea worm in the first six months of 2013, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said in the journal Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report. That's a 77 percent reduction in cases over the same period last year.

 

Oct. 24, 2013
Progress Toward Global Eradication of Dracunculiasis, January 2012 – June 2013 (PDF)
Published by Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.
A total of 542 cases were reported in 2012, compared with 1,058 in 2011. The disease remains endemic in four countries in 2013, but the overall rate of reduction in cases has accelerated compared with the first 6 months of 2012. In the month of January 2013, no cases were reported worldwide for the first time since the eradication program began in 1986. Failures in surveillance and containment, lack of clean drinking water, insecurity in Mali and parts of South Sudan, and an unusual epidemiologic pattern in Chad are the main remaining challenges to dracunculiasis eradication.

 

Sept. 29, 2013
Has the Guinea Worm Been Eradicated?
Published by Sound Medicine.
Donald Hopkins, M.D., vice president for health programs at the Carter Center, helped eradicate smallpox. Now he is close to eliminating Guinea worm disease, an infection spread by drinking water contaminated with water fleas carrying the parasitic larvae. The parasites mature in the abdomen and work their way to the surface after a year. The worms create painful lesions that release hundreds of thousands of larvae when submerged in water. "Sound Medicine" host Anne Ryder speaks with Dr. Hopkins about Guinea worm and the Carter Center's efforts to eradicate the disease.

 

Sept. 24, 2013
1988 To 2013: Nigeria's Guinea Worm Eradication Journey
Published by Daily Trust (Nigeria).
In informal terms, Nigeria is now free of guinea worm. Minister of Health, Professor Onyebuchi Chukwu was told two months ago while being debriefed by an international verification team which visited Nigeria and did a tour of the country between June 27 and July 8 to verify the claim by Nigeria that no guinea worm transmission exists anywhere in the country… The Carter Center has been in Nigeria (with Jos as its administrative base) since 1988 when the guinea worm eradication programme started.

 

Sept. 23, 2013
Finding Locally-Grown Answers to Global Health Questions
Published by Saporta Report.
The Carter Center and Google teamed up this month to host an insightful conversation between three well-known advocates of U.S. action on global health. The Google+ webcast brought together former President Jimmy Carter, Dr. Donald Hopkins, vice-president for health programs at the Carter Center, and New York Times columnist Nicholas Kristof…In my view, one of the best points made was Dr. Hopkins' view that ultimately the answers to solve global health problems must be locally-grown.

 

Sept. 18, 2013
Decades of Dedication to Fighting Disease (PDF)
Published by Creating Chemistry.
Founded by former U.S. President Jimmy Carter and his wife, Rosalynn, The Carter Center has led the Guinea Worm Eradication Program since the1980s. With Guinea worm disease poised to be the second-ever human disease to be eradicated, Jimmy Carter and Dr. Donald R. Hopkins – the Center's Vice President for Health Programs – talk about the fight against neglected tropical diseases.

 

Sept. 18, 2013
Shining a Light on Hidden Diseases (PDF)
Published by Creating Chemistry.
There is a group of diseases that have plagued humanity for centuries and which today blight the lives of a billion people in 149 countries worldwide. The impact on individuals and communities is immense and yet, until recently, they attracted little attention – and little was done to combat them. That has changed over the past few decades. Efforts are now beginning to show results. But the battle is not yet won.

 

Sept. 17, 2013
Appraising Nigeria's Quest for Guinea Worm-Free Certification
Published by Hallmark (Nigeria).
From all indications, Nigeria is set to be certified free of guinea worm disease, which has ravaged parts of the country over the years … International organisations in charge of efforts to eradicate guinea worm disease worldwide have reaffirmed that the disease has been eradicated in Nigeria via its partnership with stakeholders. For instance, Dr Emmanuel Miri, the Country Representative of the Carter Centre in Nigeria, recently asserted that Nigeria was free from guinea worm disease. Miri, who noted that the non-governmental organisation had been waging a war against guinea worm disease in the past 16 years, said that the centre had succeeded in efforts to wipe it out of Nigeria.

 

Sept. 4, 2013
Jimmy Carter, New York Times' Nicholas Kristof, and Carter Center's Donald Hopkins Cover Global Health Challenges in New Conversations on Google+ Series
On Sept. 10, former U.S. President Jimmy Carter, New York Times Op-Ed Columnist Nicholas D. Kristof, and Carter Center disease eradication expert Dr. Donald R. Hopkins held a special video chat, "Global Health: How We Can Make a Difference," to kick off a new series called Conversations on Google+ launching later this fall. 

 

Aug. 29, 2013
River Blindness, Guinea Worm Disease and More: The Work and Accomplishments of The Carter Center
Published by The Global Dispatch.
The Carter Center in Atlanta, Georgia, founded by former U.S. President Jimmy Carter and former First Lady Rosalynn Carter, is guided by a fundamental commitment to human rights and the alleviation of human suffering; it seeks to prevent and resolve conflicts, enhance freedom and democracy, and improve health, according to their website. In the area of health programs, the Center fights six preventable diseases — Guinea worm, river blindness, trachoma, schistosomiasis, lymphatic filariasis, and malaria — by using health education and simple, low-cost methods. Earlier this week I had the opportunity to speak to the expert that directs all of the health programs of The Carter Center, Vice-President of Health Programs, Donald R. Hopkins, M.D., M.P.H.

 

Aug. 28, 2013
"I'll Defeat Guinea Worm, Then Retire"
Published by BBC World Service.
Donald Hopkins is an American doctor who has done more than many to rid the world of Guinea worm. It's a horrifying disease spread through drinking water and the worm grows within its host until a metre long. Then it bursts out of the body causing great pain and incapacitating its host. Dr Hopkins began his career at Morehouse College, the all-black college in Atlanta where Martin Luther King also studied some years earlier. He has set himself the goal of eradicating Guinea worm from Africa and he's very nearly there.

 

Aug. 9, 2013
Of Worms and Water: In the Field With The Carter Center
Published by Huffington Post.
I travel as a photographer shooting images for non-profit advocacy; I am a visual storyteller in a village, in Northern Ghana, with The Carter Center. There is a Banyan tree that arcs and frames a group of young girls, gathered outside a school. Their heads dance as they lean in to catch gossip then throw them back, falling into giggles, so as I enter I see the schoolyard composing into color, dance and music. The girls are waiting for their teacher to create order, so that they can begin to learn about water and worms.

 

Aug. 6, 2013
Guinea Worm Disease is "Relatively-Contained Problem"
Published by BBC News.
There may be an important breakthrough soon in the effort to eradicate a dangerous, debilitating disease that has long been a scourge in Africa. Guinea worm disease, is a crippling parasitic disease that, until the 1980s, was affecting around 3.5 million people in more than 20 countries. But the World Health Organisation believes that within two years it may be gone. Ann Mills, Professor of health economics and policy at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, told the Today programme: "It's a relatively contained problem which is partly why it's feasible to eradicate it."

 

Aug. 1, 2013
Demise of a Disease (PDF)
Published by Ohio Wesleyan University.
Dracunculiasis, or Guinea worm disease, is far from the lives and lifestyles of most of us. But then, we are not the poorest of the poor, living in places such as Chad, Ethiopia, South Sudan, and Mali (the four countries in which the disease can still be found) — areas with limited or no basic health care services and unclean water, in which a roundworm parasite thrives.


July 29, 2013
An Extinction to Celebrate
Published by The New Yorker.
There is no vaccine for guinea worm, and there are no drugs that can cure those who are infected. The pest once afflicted hundreds of millions of people from the Gambia to India. But the worm is now gone from Guinea, and from almost everywhere else. At last count, there were only five hundred and forty-two people infected, down from an estimated 3.5 million in 1986. Of the remaining cases, exactly five hundred and twenty-one are in South Sudan. We know these numbers with precision because of a campaign that President Jimmy Carter began in 1986 to destroy the worm. That community-driven process, coördinated by the Carter Center and executed by the South Sudan Ministry of Health, village volunteers, and trained technical advisors, is driving the parasite out of its last remaining human hosts.

 

July 25, 2013
Watch "The Eradicator: Donald Hopkins — A Lifetime Spent Working to Eradicate Deadly Diseases"
Published by the Harvard School of Public Health.
Donald Hopkins, MPH '70, and currently a vice president at the Carter Center, has spent a career helping to eradicate two major tropical diseases. Beginning in the 1960s he helped lead efforts to vaccinate people in Africa and Asia against smallpox, a disease that was declared eradicated in 1980. In the 1980s, he started the Guinea Worm Disease Eradication Program at the Centers for Disease Control and in 1987 joined the Carter Center. Hopkins has spent the last three decades working to eradicate Guinea worm disease, which in 1986 affected some 3.5 million people. At the beginning of 2013, there were fewer than 600 cases left in the world.

 

July 13, 2013
Nigeria Eyes Guinea Worm-Free Certification
Published by IQ4 News (South Africa).
The International Certification Team for Guinea Worm Eradication, has expressed satisfaction with Nigeria's sustained effort towards eradication of Guinea worm.

 

June 24, 2013
Gowon Lauds Carter Foundation's Effort to Eradicate Guinea Worm
Published by the News Agency of Nigeria.
Former Head of State, Gen. Yakubu Gowon on Monday in Abuja lauded the efforts of the Carter Foundation at eradicating guinea worm in Nigeria. Gowon made the commendation when members of the International Certification Team from the WHO visited the Yakubu Gowon Foundation in Abuja. The News Agency of Nigeria (NAN) reports that the team is on a three-week mission to possibly certify Nigeria guinea worm-free.

 

June 4, 2013
For Kelly Callahan, Global Health Is "Not Just a Career But a Way of Life"
Published by Womenetics.
The Carter Center's Kelly Callahan explains how her work to end Guinea worm disease is more than just a job; and how that work has changed the lives of women in some of the world's most disadvantaged communities.

 

May 30, 2013
Harvard Awards 9 Honorary Degrees
Published by the Harvard Gazette.
As an African-American growing up during segregation, Donald R. Hopkins determined, as he once put it, "to show the world what I could do." And while Hopkins achieved his childhood dream of becoming a doctor, he more than lived up to his initial promise. In fighting for the eradication of both smallpox and Guinea worm disease — two of the 20th century's most horrific diseases — he has helped save the lives of and prevent the suffering of millions.

 

May 30, 2013
Abreu, Menino, Pagels, and Oprah: The Honorands
Published by Harvard Magazine.
Donald R. Hopkins, a graduate of Morehouse College, earned his medical degree from the University of Chicago and his master's in public health from Harvard. During two decades at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, he served as deputy director (1984-1987) and acting director (1985); he has been an assistant professor of tropical public health at the Harvard School of Public Health (which recognized him with its 2012 Alumni Award of Merit), and directed the program to eradicate smallpox and control measles in Sierra Leone from 1967 to 1969.

 

May 29, 2013
Peaceful Priorities (PDF)
Published by Glass Magazine.
In theory, The Carter Center sounds like a knight in shining armour, making tall promises to come and save the day. In practice? This is exactly what it is… Proof of this lies in one particularly admirable accomplishment: The Carter Center is close to completely eradicating an illness by the name of "Guinea worm disease."

 

May 28, 2013
Video: Eradicating the Guinea Worm: Kelly Callahan at TEDxAtlanta
Published by TEDxAtlanta. (Run time: 13:40)
The Carter Center's Kelly Callahan shares how the simplest solutions, applied at huge scale, have almost achieved humankind's second complete eradication of a disease that once plagued millions of people.

 

May 14, 2013
Niger Offers Cash Reward to Help Eradicate Guinea Worm
Published by Reuters.
Niger is offering cash rewards to anyone reporting a case of Guinea worm as part of efforts to permanently eradicate the parasitic disease in the impoverished West African nation, the health ministry said. Though it once afflicted around 3.5 million people annually across Asia and Africa, according to the U.S.-based Carter Center, Guinea worm disease is now on the verge of being eradicated worldwide.

 

May 13, 2013
Dracunculiasis Eradication – Global Surveillance Summary, 2012 (PDF)
Published in Weekly Epidemiological Record, No. 19, 2013, 88, 189–200. © World Health Organization. This report summarizes the progress made in the Guinea worm eradication goal until the end of 2012.

 

April 22, 2013
Profiles in Science: Donald R. Hopkins on Guinea Worm Disease
Published by The New York Times.
As the world inches closer to the eradication of Guinea worm disease, Dr. Donald R. Hopkins reflects on how the prejudice he experienced growing up in the American south helped him communicate with the rural villages most affected by the parasite. Dr. Hopkins is the vice president for health programs at the Carter Center, the group founded by former President Jimmy Carter to advance human rights and fight disease.

 

April 20, 2013
Death of the Guinea Worm Draws Near
Published by the Atlanta Journal-Constitution.
In 1986, roughly 3.5 million people in 21 countries across Africa and Asia contracted Guinea worm. That was the year The Carter Center launched a global campaign to eradicate the disease, which is spread through contaminated water. Last year, thanks largely to the efforts of the center, the CDC and the World Health Organization, there were 542 reported cases.

 

April 9, 2013
President Carter on The Daily Show with Jon Stewart | Part 1 > | Part 2 >
Aired on Comedy Central's The Daily Show with Jon Stewart.
President Carter appeared on The Daily Show with Jon Stewart and explained how The Carter Center has nearly eradicated Guinea worm disease. President Carter also discussed latrine building in Ethiopia to prevent trachoma and answered a few questions about the news of the day. 

 

April 3, 2013
Guinea Worm Disease on the Way Out
Published by the Australian Broadcasting Company.
The human race has only ever wiped out one single infectious disease — and that was smallpox. We could wipe out smallpox because it had just one single reservoir — people like you and me. Well, for the same reason, we might be able to eradicate another very nasty infectious disease — Guinea worm disease.

 

March 25, 2013
Former President Carter Says His Organization is on Verge of Eradicating Guinea Worm Disease
Published by Current TV/The Young Turks with Cenk Uygur.
Cenk Uygur sits down with former President Jimmy Carter to talk about the Carter Center and its work to wipe out the Guinea worm, a water parasite that affects many impoverished countries. "The Carter Center really fills vacuums in the world," Carter says. "[Guinea worm] was a disease that not many public officials knew about — it was in the most remote villages in the world. And it was a very difficult disease to know how to correct. We figured all of those answers out … and we are right on the verge of eradicating this disease."

 

March 1, 2013
Interview: President Jimmy Carter
Published by Vision Magazine.
Since its foundation in 1982, the Carter Center has touched the lives of millions around the world. In this exclusive interview, President Jimmy Carter talks to Vision about the Center's work eradicating diseases and his unwavering mission to improve the lives of the world's poorest people.

 

Feb. 27, 2013
El hombre que va a Extinguir un Animal a Propósito por Primera vez en la Historia
Published by the Spanish publication Materia.
El epidemiólogo Ernesto Ruiz-Tiben, de 74 años, está a punto de culminar la campaña de erradicación del horroroso gusano de Guinea, a la que ha dedicado las últimas tres décadas de su vida.

 

Feb. 8, 2013
When Species Extermination is a Good Thing
Published by The Wall Street Journal.
It's not a race, exactly, but there's an intriguing uncertainty about whether a former U.S. president or a software magnate will cause the next deliberate extinction of a species in the wild. Will Jimmy Carter eradicate Guinea worm before Bill Gates eradicates polio?

 

Jan. 24, 2013
The Guinea Worm: A Fond Obituary
Published by the National Geographic blog "The Loom."
Its official name is Dracunculus medinensis. It's commonly known the guinea worm. Measuring up to four feet long, the worms were lodged in the connective tissue inside the legs of the Tambura patients, their head poking out of a blister. The only way to get rid of the guinea worms was to wind them onto sticks, which nurses then twisted, slowly and steadily, for two weeks…. In 1986, 3.5 million people suffered from guinea worm infections across Asia and Africa. In 2012, there were only 542 cases in the entire world. The vast majority of those cases–521–occurred in South Sudan.

 

Jan. 22, 2013
Health Check Interview with Dr. Paul Emerson
Published by Voice of America.
Host Linord Moudou interviews Dr. Paul Emerson about NTDs. with a specific focus on the Center's Guinea worm and trachoma work.

 

Jan. 19, 2013
Inching Closer to the Demise of a Stubborn Parasitic Worm
Published by the NPR blog "Shots."
What's the big fuss about Guinea worm, a parasite that now infects just a few hundred people? Well, the public health community finally has the nasty bug's back against the wall. There were only 542 cases of Guinea worm worldwide last year, the Carter Center said this week. That's 48 percent less than in 2011. And it's a mere blip compared to the 3.5 million cases back in 1986.

 

Jan. 18, 2013
Guinea Worm Eradication Campaign Posts Another Milestone
Published by the Atlanta Journal Constitution.
An international effort to eradicate Guinea worm disease, spearheaded by former President Jimmy Carter and the Carter Center, reached another milestone. The center announced that the campaign has reached "its final stages" with 542 cases reported worldwide in 2012. These provisional case numbers, reported by ministries of health in the remaining four endemic nations , show that cases of the disease were reduced by nearly half last year. According to the Carter Center, there were 3.5 million cases of Guinea worm in 21 nations in Africa and Asia in 1986.

 

Jan. 18, 2013
Rare Tropical Disease Close to Eradication
Published by CNN.com/Health.
A rare tropical disease called Guinea worm is closer to being eradicated, according to former President Jimmy Carter and other experts.There are now only 542 known cases of Guinea worm left worldwide, as of 2012, representing a 48% decrease from 2011, officials said Thursday at a news conference. "We cannot rest until we get and contain the very last case," said Dr. Donald R. Hopkins, affiliated with the Carter Center in Atlanta, which has been instrumental in the effort to wipe out Guinea worm.

 

Jan. 17, 2013
Jimmy Carter: Guinea Worm Cases Decreasing
Published by the Associated Press. Picked up by more than 4,000 additional outlets.
Guinea worm disease cases were cut to less than 600 in 2012, marking significant progress in eradicating the parasitic infection, former President Jimmy Carter said Thursday. The effort to eradicate the disease, which is spread by drinking contaminated water, has been a major focus of the former president and the Atlanta-based Carter Center. In 2012, there were 542 cases reported in four countries.

 

Jan. 17, 2013
Guinea Worm: S. Sudan World's Most Affected, Says Carter Center
Published by the Sudan Tribune.
South Sudan remains the most Guinea Worm affected country in the world, with 521 cases out of the 542 reported worldwide last year, the Carter Center said on Thursday. The provisional Guinea worm totals for 2012, released by the US-based center, founded by former US President, Jimmy Carter, also indicates a 99% reduction of 10, 7 and 4 other cases in Chad, Mali and Ethiopia respectively.


Jan. 17, 2013
Fighting in Mali Hampers Guinea Worm Disease Eradication
Published by The New York Times.
Fighting in Mali has damaged the global effort to eradicate Guinea worm disease, former President Jimmy Carter said Thursday. Guinea worm, also known as dracunculiasis, and polio are the two diseases closest to total eradication; each is down to fewer than 1,000 known cases.

 

Nov. 1, 2012
Yaws Eradication: Facing Old Problems, Raising New Hopes (PDF)
This article was published in the November 2012 issue of PLoS Neglected Tropical Diseases.
One cannot help but recalling that the most advanced eradication programme, targeting Guinea worm (dracunculiasis), is basically in the hands of the Carter Center in Atlanta (United States), which recently received $40 million in donations from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation to complete its job. In 2011, cases of Guinea worm disease occurred in three remaining endemic nations — South Sudan, Mali, and Ethiopia — and in Chad, where there was an isolated outbreak.

 

Oct. 13, 2012
'Guinea Worm' Close to Extinction
Published by Al Jazeera English
A parasite that infects people called the Guinea worm can grow up to a metre in length and lives under the skin.

 

Oct. 10, 2012
Eradication: Tide May Be Turning Against Guinea Worm
Published by the Financial Times. Note: The Financial Times website requires that you register (for free) to access the full article.
With cases of guinea worm disease down from 3.5m in 21 countries in 1986 to a matter of hundreds in four African countries today, the near eradication of this painful and debilitating disease is being celebrated as a global health success story. However, unlike many disease eradication programmes, no drugs or immunisations were available. Progress in this fight has depended on aggressive advocacy efforts at every level of society.

 

Oct. 10, 2012
A Little Effort Can Produce Great Strides
Published by the Financial Times. Note: The Financial Times website requires that you register (for free) to access the full article.
From river blindness and buruli ulcer to elephantiasis, the country had plenty of health problems that affected its poorest residents. It harboured one of the largest number of cases of guinea worm outside Sudan, a disease energetically targeted for global eradication by former US president Jimmy Carter through his foundation.

 

Sept. 30, 2012
Extinction by Design: Guinea Worm
Published by Scientific American.
Though I could find little about the biology of rinderpest for the last post, guinea worm is a case of the opposite: Way Too Much Information. Guinea worm inspires horror not so much by its life history (many infectious organisms find ways to wander about your body at will), but by its size, Homo sapiens-escape method, and terrifying treatment.

 

Aug. 27, 2012
Guinea Worm is Poised to Become the Second Human Disease to be Eradicated
Published by The Washington Post.
Guinea worm disease is reaching the end of its days. The parasitic infection, which has sickened millions, mostly in Asia and Africa, is on the verge of being done in not by sophisticated medicine but by aggressive public health efforts in some of the poorest and most remote parts of the world.

 

July 24, 2012
Ein übler Geselle kurz vor dem Aus
Published in the German publication Spektrum.de.
Die Uhr für den Guineawurm tickt: Bald soll der üble Parasit ausgerottet sein - als zweite Krankheit nach den Pocken. Doch die letzten Meter werden schwierig.

 

July 22, 2012
The President and the Parasite
Published by ABC News.
Dr. Karl Kruszelnicki talks about the impending demise of Guinea Worm Disease, which looks set to follow smallpox and be eradicated completely, thanks in large part to former U.S. President Jimmy Carter.

 

July 19, 2012
Guinea Worm Could Be Second Disease Wiped Off the Earth
Published by the Toronto Star.
An ancient parasite known as the "fiery serpent" is on track to be the second human disease eradicated since smallpox's demise in 1979.

 

July 15, 2012
The World's Last Worm: A Dreaded Disease Nears Eradication
Published by Scientific American.
A parasite that has plagued the human race since antiquity is poised to become the second human disease after smallpox to be eradicated. "We are approaching the demise of the last guinea worm who will ever live on earth," says former U.S. president Jimmy Carter, whose Carter Center has spearheaded the eradication effort.

 

May 11, 2012
Dracunculiasis Eradication – Global Surveillance Summary, 2011 (PDF)
Published in Weekly Epidemiological Record, No. 19, 2012, 87, 177-188. © World Health Organization. This report summarizes the progress made in the Guinea worm eradication goal until the end of 2012.

 

May 9, 2012
War on a Worm: Education a Key to Eradication
Published by Worcester Telegram & Gazette.
In a couple of years, guinea worm will likely join smallpox as a disease with zero sufferers, The Carter Center in Atlanta reports. Former President Carter is a leading figure in the push against the parasite, and says he hopes to outlive it.

 

April 26, 2012
Getting Guinea Worm Gone: Report from the AHCJ Conference (Audio Podcast)
Published by ScientificAmerican.com.
Scientific American editor Christine Gorman talks about the recent conference of the Association of Health Care Journalists, including Jimmy Carter's efforts against guinea worm and trachoma, and Rosalynn Carter's mental health initiatives.

 

April 23, 2012
Jimmy Carter's Successful War Against Tropical Diseases
Published by The Globe and Mail.
One of the most exclusive clubs on Earth is that of living ex-U.S. presidents. The gang of four – Jimmy Carter, George Bush Sr., Bill Clinton and George W. Bush – spend their retirement years hitting the links, building presidential libraries, giving $100,000 speeches, writing autobiographies and doing humanitarian work.

 

April 20, 2012
Atlantans on Verge of Eradicating Worm Disease
Published by WXIA-TV.
Soon, perhaps within a year or two, headlines around the world will flash news of historic magnitude – news that a crippling disease that afflicts children and adults has been eradicated, wiped off the face of the earth.

 

April 19, 2012
Local Impact: Moving Mountains to Prevent Disease (PDF)
Published in Emory Public Health by the Rollins School of Public Health, a component of the Woodruff Health Sciences Center of Emory University (emoryhealthsciences.org).
Every day, Rollins students and alumni are building public health capacity throughout the nonprofit sector in Atlanta and across the state. Moses Katabarwa and Adam Weiss are health leaders at the Carter Center, one of Rollins' public health partners in the Atlanta community.

 

March 21, 2012
South Sudan Inches Closer to Eradicating Guinea Worm
Published by Voice of America.
South Sudan, the world's newest country, is on the brink of its first health-care success.  Cases of guinea worm have dropped dramatically in the past five years and there is hope that in 2012 transmission will be stopped completely.

 

Feb. 29, 2012
El gusano de Guinea, una enfermedad tropical cerca de ser erradicada
Published by CNN in Espańol.
Organizaciones no lucrativas públicas y privadas indican que quedan menos de 600 casos de esta condición y planean acabar con ella para 2015.

 

Feb. 4, 2012
Neglected Tropical Diseases: The World's Nastiest Illnesses Get Some Belated Attention
Published by The Economist.
GLOBAL health campaigns like grand goals. On January 30th Bill Gates joined the head of the World Health Organisation (WHO), 13 drug-company executives and others in pledging to eradicate or control by 2020 ten of the world's nastiest diseases, which afflict more than a billion people. Guinea worm, sleeping sickness, bilharzia (which doctors call schistosomiasis) and the others rot tissue and cripple the organs. Even if they do not kill, they stunt children and sap adults' energies.

 

Feb. 1, 2012
Grace: Nigeria's Last Case of Guinea Worm
Published by KPLU.
After my first visit to Nigeria in 2001, when I saw more than my fair share of guinea worm infections, I returned to Nigeria for a book project I claimed to be working on. It was 2009 and I was a freelancer.

 

Feb. 1, 2012
How Jimmy Carter Became a Serpent Slayer and Global Health Pioneer
Published by KPLU.
Former President Jimmy Carter is in Seattle, having spoken last night at the World Affairs Council's 60th anniversary celebration and speaking today at the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation about Guinea worm.

 

Jan. 30, 2012
Gates Initiative on "Neglected Diseases" Advances Cause, But Neglects Key Questions
Published by KPLU.
The Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation today announced, together with more than a dozen drug makers and others, a new initiative aimed at fighting a select group of mostly developing world ailments called "neglected tropical diseases" such as river blindness, parasitic elephantiasis and others.

 

Jan. 30, 2012
Sheikh Khalifa Pledges US$10 Million in Support of Carter Center-led Eradication Campaign to End Guinea Worm
Published by the Emirates News Agency.
President His Highness Sheikh Khalifa bin Zayed Al Nahyan has presented US$ 10 million in support to a Carter Center-led eradication campaign to end Guinea worm disease by 2015.

 

Jan. 30, 2012
Drug Companies Join Forces to Combat Deadliest Tropical Diseases
Published by The Guardian.
The heads of 13 of the world's biggest drug companies, brought together by Bill Gates, have agreed to donate more medicines and, in a rare spirit of co-operation, to work together to find new ones in an attempt to end many neglected tropical diseases that kill and maim some of the poorest people on the planet.

 

Jan. 30, 2012
Carter Center Gets $40M to Eradicate Guinea Worm
Associated Press article appeared on Huffington Post, Boston Globe, MiamiHerald.com, and over 200 news outlets.
The Carter Center on Monday announced it received $40 million in donations to help fuel its mission to eradicate Guinea worm disease, a debilitating parasite that once plagued millions of people across the developing world.

 

Jan. 30, 2012
Gates Pledges Money to Guinea Worm Fight
Published by CNN.com.
Less than a week after the the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation announced it would give $750 million to the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria, the foundation has pledged $23.3 million to a lesser-known disease: Guinea worm.

 

Jan. 20, 2012
Web Extra: Jimmy and Rosalynn Carter Tell Piers Morgan About Their Goal of Eradicating Guinea Worm
Published by CNN.
Only one infectious disease has ever been eradicated: smallpox.  But thanks largely to the efforts of Jimmy and Rosalynn Carter, the former president told Piers Morgan that guinea worm will soon be the second.  "We found 3-and-a-half million cases of guinea worm still existing, and now we have less than a thousand cases, so we'll soon eliminate guinea worm from the face of the earth," said Carter.

 

Oct. 12, 2011
Eradicating Guinea Worm
Published by Here & Now.
Only one human disease has ever been completely eradicated — smallpox — but we are now close to eliminating a second: dracunculiasis or Guinea worm disease.

 

Oct. 6, 2011
UK Gives £20m to Carter's War on Guinea Worm
Published by The Independent.
The fight to eradicate the gruesome and debilitating "Guinea worm" disease, making it only the second in the world to be wiped out after smallpox, is on the verge of success after it secured £20m funding from the government.

 

Oct. 6, 2011
Battle Against Crippling Parasitic Disease Nearly Won, Says Carter (PDF)
Published by The Guardian.
The world is tantalisingly close to eradicating guinea worm disease, which would make it only the second disease of humans to be wiped from the planet, according to former U.S. President Jimmy Carter.

 

Oct. 5, 2011
Efforts to End Worm Disease Get British Boost
Published by CNN.com – The Chart Blog.
Britain will back a final push to wipe out a debilitating parasitic worm disease that is on the verge of worldwide eradication.

 

Oct. 5, 2011
Jimmy Carter Spearheads Final Drive to Eradicate Guinea Worm Disease
Published by The Guardian.
The world is tantalisingly close to eradicating Guinea worm disease, which would make it only the second disease of humans to be wiped from the planet, according to former U.S. President Jimmy Carter.

 

Oct. 5, 2011
Fresh Push to Rid the World of Guinea Worm by 2015
Published by the BBC.
The U.K. government is backing a new campaign to try to rid the world of Guinea worm by 2015.

 

Oct. 5, 2011
Britain joins Jimmy Carter to Wipe Out Worm Disease
Published by Agence France Presse.
Britain pledged Wednesday to contribute £20 million to the funding of a campaign spearheaded by former U.S. President Jimmy Carter that aims to eradicate a debilitating parasitic disease by 2015.

 

Oct. 5, 2011 
Carter Centre Calls for Wider Immunisation Programme
Published by the Financial Times.
The long-running and expensive campaign to eradicate polio – which costs about $1bn a year – is likely to fail unless it is combined with vaccines that combat other deadly diseases such as measles, a leading public health specialist has warned.

 

Oct. 5, 2011
UK Push to Wipe Out Guinea Worm Disease
Published by the Department for International Development.
Britain today announced it will provide major support to a new project that will make Guinea worm the second human disease to be eradicated in human history.

 

Oct. 5, 2011
Goodbye, Guinea Worm
Published the Department for International Development.
U.K. aid is supporting an ongoing campaign by U.S. nongovernmental organization, The Carter Center, to wipe out Guinea worm disease. The disease has been reduced by 99% in the last 25 years and could be eradicated by the end of this decade.

 

Oct. 5, 2011
Neglected No More: UK DFID Working With Carter Center to Eradicate Tropical Disease
Published by the Foreign & Commonwealth Office (UK).
Sadly I am leaving Washington at the end of October to return to London. As my departure looms, and my move to the U.K. draws closer, I find I am increasingly reflecting on the differences and similarities between U.S. and U.K., and in particular for my portfolio – foreign assistance.

 

Oct. 4, 2011
Jimmy Carter Seeks Donors To Help Wipe Out Guinea Worm
Published by the Huffington Post.
Former U.S. President Jimmy Carter is appealing for other donors to join Britain in a multi-million dollar campaign to wipe out guinea worm, a crippling and painful parasitic disease that now exists only in four African countries.

 

Aug. 3, 2011
Ghana Joins 14 Other African Nations in Eradicating Guinea Worm
Published by Voice of America.
Ghana has joined 14 other African countries in eradicating Guinea worm disease. The announcement from the Carter Center in Atlanta says the disease cycle has been broken after a 23-year nationwide battle.

 

Aug. 1, 2011
Evening Focus: Interview with The Carter Center, Part 3 – Responding to Guinea Worm Outbreaks
Published by Blogistan Polytechnic Institute.
The key to eradicating Guinea worm disease is "surveillance, surveillance, surveillance."

 

July 29, 2011
Ghana Eradicates Guinea Worm After 23-Year Fight
Published by the Associated Press.
Jimmy Carter watched in horror as the inches- (centimeters-) long worm emerged from the breast of a woman in remote northern Ghana. That was in the 1980s. The former U.S. president dedicated himself to eradicating the sickness and estimated it would take 10 years. On Thursday, after 23 years of hard work and a major setback, Ghana finally declared victory.

 

July 25, 2011
Evening Focus: In Africa with The Carter Center, Part 2 – Safe Water
Published by Blogistan Polytechnic Institute.
Americans often take clean water for granted. But in Africa, as The Carter Center's Craig Withers explains, clean water can be hard to find.

 

July 18, 2011
Evening Focus: In Africa with The Carter Center, Part 1
Published by Blogistan Polytechnic Institute.
I had the pleasure to interview Craig Withers of The Carter Center about their work to eradicate Guinea Worm Disease in Africa.

 

July 14, 2011
Newest Country on Track to Kill Ancient Disease
Published by New Scientist.
It isn't often these days that a whole new country comes into being. But that just happened, with the official hiving off of South Sudan from the rest of Sudan on 9 July.

 

Aug. 3, 2011
Ghana Joins 14 Other African Nations in Eradicating Guinea Worm
Published by Voice of America.
Ghana has joined 14 other African countries in eradicating Guinea worm disease. The announcement from the Carter Center in Atlanta says the disease cycle has been broken after a 23-year nationwide battle.

 

July 18, 2011
Epidemiology: In Losing Its Southern States to Secession, Sudan Also Sheds Its Guinea Worm Cases
Published by The New York Times.
As of July 15, one more country was declared free of the guinea worm: Sudan. But it was a hollow victory. That was the date Sudan split in two and South Sudan became the world's newest country — and all the known Sudanese cases are in the south.

 

June 10, 2011
Farewell to Guinea Worm
Published by National Geographic Magazine.
It's not every day that a disease disappears, but Guinea worm disease may be next, after smallpox.  Thanks to international efforts led by The Carter Center, just 1,797 cases were reported worldwide last year, most in what is now South Sudan.

 

May 13, 2011
Dracunculiasis Eradication – Global Surveillance Summary, 2010 (PDF)
Published in Weekly Epidemiological Record, No. 20, 2011, 86, 189–204. © World Health Organization. This report summarizes the progress made in the Guinea worm eradication goal until the end of 2010.

 

April 26, 2011
Infectious Diseases Burden in South Sudan
Published in The Lancet, Infectious Diseases, Vol. 11. Subscription required to read
the full article.

There is, however, one cause for genuine hope. Independence for South Sudan could spell the end for Guinea worm disease. It has been targeted by WHO for eradication, and thanks to the work of the Carter Centre, such an outcome looks eminently achievable. Last year, there were 1785 cases, 1690 of which were in South Sudan (the handful of other cases occurred in Ethiopia, Mali, and Ghana).

 

April 18, 2011
Carter Center in Final Push to Eradicate Guinea Worm Disease
Published by Voice of America.
As Southern Sudan prepares to emerge on the world stage as the newest nation on the planet, health workers combating Guinea Worm disease are hoping the country's independence will energize the campaign against the parasite.

 

March 27, 2011
How Guinea Worm Was Eradicated in Nigeria (Full text no longer available.)
Published by The Nation (Nigeria).
Resident Technical Adviser for the Carter Centre's Health Programmes in Nigeria, Dr Emmanuel Miri, in this interview with Yusufu Aminu Idegu, speaks on the eradication of Guinea worm in the country and how to prevent re-occurrence.

 

March 21, 2011
Nigeria Wins War Against Guinea Worm (PDF)
Published by TELL Magazine.
Millions of Nigerians may be spared future suffering as Carter Center announces it has stopped transmission of Guinea worm disease in the country.

 

March 17, 2011
How to Solve Really Big Problems
Published by the Huffington Post.
I recently attended a press conference at The Carter Center in Atlanta where Jimmy Carter announced that after 25 years of work, they have practically eradicated Guinea Worm disease from the face of the Earth.

 

March 8, 2011
The President Takes a Chance on Failure
Published by Success Magazine.
Jimmy Carter was forcibly retired at 56, in debt and embarrassed. He could've played golf. Jimmy Carter is visiting a poor village in tropical Ghana when he notices a beautiful woman in her 20s standing near the edge of a crowd. She's holding her arms as though clutching a baby. He approaches her to ask the baby's name "just to be friendly," as he recalls later. But what he sees leaves the former president fighting back tears.

 

March 7, 2011
End Game for Guinea Worm Disease is Near
Published by the Emory Report.
Former U.S. President and Carter Center founder Jimmy Carter announced on Feb. 17 that only three endemic countries remain in the fight against Guinea worm disease, poised to be only the second disease in history—after smallpox—to be eradicated.

 

March 5, 2011
Jimmy Carter, Worm Slayer (Video)
Published by The Huffington Post.
Whenever Jimmy Carter makes a statement, opinions fly.
Yet it wasn't the former U.S. President's political views that had a crowd of students and parents gasping during his speech at an Atlanta private school February 17. It was his talk of a horrific creature known as Guinea Worm that elicited dropped jaws from the audience.

 

Feb. 28, 2011
Parasitic Disease: Guinea Worm Takes a Step Closer to Eradication, Jimmy Carter Says
Published by The New York Times.
The guinea worm is a spaghetti-thin parasite that has proved notoriously hard to eradicate around the world. Now former President Jimmy Carter, who has led a 25-year campaign against guinea worm disease, is reporting progress in the effort to make it only the second human disease to be eradicated, after smallpox.

 

Feb. 23, 2011
Guinea Worm: Parasitic Infection Nears Extinction
Published by PBS Newshour.
Officials at the Atlanta-based Carter Center said this week that the effort to eradicate the Guinea Worm parasite – a scourge that dates back to Biblical times – is now 99 percent complete.

 

Feb. 22, 2011
Guinea Worm: Second Disease In History To Disappear?
Published by The Huffington Post.
For all of the mind-boggling achievements of modern medicine, only one – one! – disease has ever been completely eradicated: smallpox. But now guinea worm -- the preventable disease that forces people to live with worms up to three-feet long inside them – is teetering on the brink of joining that very, very short list of diseases.

 

Feb. 18, 2011
Nigeria Halts Transmission of Guinea Worm
Published by Reuters Africa.
Nigeria has halted transmission of Guinea worm disease, bringing closer the moment when a disease is eradicated from the planet for just the second time in history, former U.S. President Jimmy Carter said on Thursday.

 

Feb. 7, 2011
The Objective Here Is Zero Cases Worldwide
Published by the Atlanta Journal Constitution.
Guinea worm disease, a parasitic illness contracted by the poorest Africans who drink contaminated water, has been called the "forgotten disease of forgotten people."

 

Feb. 3, 2011
Killing the 'Fiery Serpent'
Published by the Harvard Gazette.
Health officials are poised to eradicate guinea worm disease, a plague that once afflicted millions and which would be just the second human disease wiped from the face of the earth, Donald Hopkins, vice president of health programs for The Carter Center, said Tuesday (Feb. 1).

 

Jan. 19, 2011
A Vote Against the Guinea Worm
Published in New Scientist.
GOOD news from Africa. We may be in a position to eradicate the Guinea worm (previous story "
Southern Sudan's votes could kill an ancient disease"). If we succeed, this will only be the second human disease to be wiped out, after smallpox in 1980.

 

Jan. 19, 2011
Southern Sudan's Votes Could Kill an Ancient Disease
Published by New Scientist.
Since 1986 The Carter Center, a charity headed by former US president Jimmy Carter, has helped these people filter water and keep emerging worms out of ponds. Now only four countries still have the worm – and of these, Ghana, Ethiopia and Mali are practically rid of it. Of the 1785 cases found last year, 1690 were in Southern Sudan.

 

Jan. 15, 2011
Looking to the Future in Sudan: Dr. Donald R. Hopkins' Letter to the Editor, The New York Times
This letter sent Jan. 11, 2011, by Carter Center Health Programs Vice President Donald R. Hopkins, M.D., M.P.H., is in response to an editorial published Jan. 8, 2011, by The New York Times.
"Southern Sudan Votes" (editorial, Jan. 8) rightly notes that the government of southern Sudan has "set up more than two dozen ministries and built schools and roads" since the signing of the comprehensive peace agreement in 2005.

 

Dec. 25, 2010
Jimmy Carter vs. Guinea Worm: Sudan is Last Battle
Published by the Associated Press.
Lily pads and purple flowers dot one corner of the watering hole. Bright green algae covers another. Two women collect water in plastic jugs while a cattle herder bathes nearby.

 

Dec. 21, 2010
Jimmy Carter's Dream of Eradication: CNN Impact Your World
Former U.S. President Jimmy Carter discusses the Carter Center's efforts to eradicate Guinea worm disease.

 

Dec. 13, 2010
The President and the Worm – Jimmy Carter's Fight to Eradicate the Guinea Worm
Published by Der Spiegel.
Nobel Peace Prize laureate Jimmy Carter is leading a unique battle to eradicate the Guinea worm. His efforts have brought the painful infection, transmitted via contaminated water, to the brink of elimination. The decisive battle is being fought in Sudan. Read
"The President and the Worm – Jimmy Carter's Fight to Eradicate the Guinea Worm" (English) or "Der Präsident und der Wurm –  Friedensnobelpreisträger Jimmy Carter führt einen einzigartigen Krieg gegen einen Parasiten" (Deutsch) >

Online Extras:

 

Nov. 8, 2010
Breaking a Vicious Cycle
Published by Emory Magazine.
Jimmy Carter is planning a send-off for the last Guinea worm on earth. Founded in 1982 by former U.S. President Jimmy Carter and his wife, Rosalynn Carter, The Carter Center, in partnership with Emory, has worked to advance human rights and alleviate human suffering in more than seventy countries. One of the center's core activities, the Guinea Worm Eradication Program, is nearing the finish line, with only four countries still reporting cases. President Carter spoke with Emory Magazine about the program's impressive achievements and the lessons learned along the way.

 

Nov. 8, 2010
Lost and Found
Published by Emory Magazine.
In 1987, as a second civil war engulfed southern Sudan, David Thon 08MPH fled his rural village in search of a safe haven, eventually emigrating to the United States in 2001. Last year, on behalf of The Carter Center, he returned home to help eradicate an ancient scourge, 'waging peace' one patient at a time.

 

Oct. 27, 2010
A President's Promise (PDF)
Published by Emory Health magazine.
President Carter made a vow to wipe an ancient and terrible disease from the face of the earth, and two decades later, he's on the verge of making it happen.

 

Oct. 12, 2010
Carter's Work to Eradicate Diseases Nearly Complete
Distributed by The Associated Press.
Former President Jimmy Carter says his mission to eradicate two diseases that have affected millions in some of the world's poorest nations is nearly complete
.

 

Oct. 8, 2010
How Fight Against Guinea Worm Was Won
Published by CNN.
It's a disease that has plagued Africans for decades, now medical researchers believe they are on their way to eradicating it.

 

Sept. 22, 2010
Carter Center Puts End to Dreaded Disease
Published by Voice of America.
Carter Center says Nigeria is latest country to eradicate water-born parasite Guinea worm."Sudan is the last stand for Guinea worm disease," says former U.S. president Jimmy Carter.  In the country's southern region, almost 1400 people have the disease, says the Atlanta-based Carter Center.

 

Sept. 18, 2010
Eradicating Guinea Worm Disease — A Prelude to NTD Elimination
Published in The Lancet. Volume 376, Issue 9745, Pages 947 - 948, doi:10.1016/S0140-6736(10)61437-7.
The drive to eradicate Guinea worm or dracunculiasis from the planet is one of today's great but unrecognised public health successes. Narrated by Sigourney Weaver and focusing on the two-decade long programme to eradicate Guinea worm driven by the Carter Center and WHO, Foul Water Fiery Serpent tracks the progress of these efforts.

 

Aug. 4, 2010
Carter Center Experts and Partners Chronicle "Nigeria's Triumph" Over Ancient Guinea Worm Disease in American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene Article
In the August 2010 issue of the American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene, a new paper co-authored by experts from the Nigeria Ministry of Health, The Carter Center, and the World Health Organization, details Nigeria's historic triumph over many challenges to successfully eliminate the ancient waterborne plague Guinea worm disease (also known as dracunculiasis).

 

July 15, 2010
Ghana to be Declared Free of Guinea Worms
Published by CEDEP.
Ghana recorded only eight cases of guinea worm from January to June this year, with the hope that the country would soon be declared a guinea worm-free country.

 

July 7, 2010
Out of the Darkness: Wiring a Desert Village
Published by Wired magazine.
Freelance photographer Peter DiCampo, who has worked for The Carter Center numerous times, is the featured interview for this piece from WIRED magazine's blog "Raw File." Using his photographs as a starting point, DiCampo recounts how Wantugu, Ghana has changed since electricity arrived in the village.

 

July 9, 2010
Jimmy & Rosalynn Carter: Fighting Guinea Worm to the Death (PDF)
Published by Lives – New Answers for Global Health (a new publication from Scientific American).Posted with permission.
It was more than two decades ago that former President Jimmy Carter saw his first case of Guinea Worm, the flesh-burrowing parasite that for centuries has caused agony in poor, remote parts of the world. But Mr. Carter recalls that moment — an image forever seared in his mind — as if it were yesterday.

 

May 21, 2010
Video: Anyak vs. the Guinea Worm
Published by The New York Times.

Nicholas D. Kristof follows a young Sudanese boy with a parasite infection who is quarantined for treatment.

 

May 7, 2010
Dracunculiasis Eradication – Global Surveillance Summary, 2009 (PDF)
Published in Weekly Epidemiological Record, No. 19, 2010, 85, 165–176. © World Health Organization. This report summarizes the progress made in the Guinea worm eradication goal until the end of 2009.

 

April 28, 2010
Winning the Worm War
Nicholas D. Kristof op-ed by The New York Times.
Former President Jimmy Carter's plan to eradicate Guinea worm worldwide is succeeding because local villagers are involved in the effort.

 

April 16, 2010
Eradicating a Global Scourge
Published by PBS's Religion & Ethics NewsWeekly.
PBS's Religion & Ethics NewsWeekly examines religion's role and the ethical dimensions of top news headlines. Fred de Sam Lazaro traveled to Southern Sudan with the Carter Center delegation to cover President Carter's Guinea worm eradication efforts.

 

April 13, 2010
President Carter in Sudan: Guinea Worm's Last Frontier (PDF)
Published by Oasis Magazine.
As President Carter visits Sudan, the last frontier of Guinea Worm disease, Oasis interviews him and finds out more about how the Carter Center was able to eradicate a disease.

 

April 15, 2010
Jimmy Carter: Waging Peace. Fighting Disease.
Published by Malibu Magazine.
James Earl Carter was the first U.S. president born in a hospital. That might seem like a trivial fact, but given Carter's lifelong dedication to the advancement of human rights, one can't help but trace his benevolence back to the beginning, an era when state-of-the-art advancements in science and medicine resulted in longer, healthier lives for people affluent enough to benefit from them. Carter's unwavering devotion to the greatest humanitarian causes of our time span the majority of his 86 years, and he has been a steadfast bastion of freedom and equality since beginning his political career in the early 1960s.

 

April 8, 2010
PBS's "NewsHour," CNN.com, and Public Radio International's "The World" Report on Southern Sudan, Last Bastion for Historic Campaign to Eradicate Guinea Worm Disease
In early February 2010, a global health unit from PBS's "NewsHour," Public Radio International's "The World," and CNN.com visited Southern Sudan with former U.S. President Jimmy Carter and Center health staff to explore progress toward Guinea worm disease eradication in this last bastion for the parasitic infection.

 

April 7, 2010
PBS's "NewsHour" Airs Special Feature on Campaign to End Guinea Worm Disease
In early February 2010, a global health unit from PBS's "NewsHour," visited Southern Sudan with former U.S. President Jimmy Carter and Center health staff to explore progress toward Guinea worm disease eradication in this last bastion for the parasitic infection.

 

April 6, 2010
CNN.com Features Major Coverage of Guinea Worm Eradication Efforts in Southern Sudan
Join CNN.com, the world's leading news Web site, for its major coverage of Southern Sudan's final struggle to wipe out Guinea worm disease.

 

March 29, 2010
Eradicating Guinea Worm Disease
This program aired March 29, 2010, on PRI's The World (from the BBC, PRI, and WGBH). Accompanying Web feature includes photos, article, and full-length audio interview with former U.S. President Jimmy Carter. Run time: 28:14.
A global campaign to eradicate Guinea worm disease is tantalizingly close to success. The parasitic infection, caused by a worm that can grow three feet long before it emerges from a patient's body, now affects just a few thousand people per year. Almost all of the remaining cases are in Southern Sudan. Former U.S. President Jimmy Carter, who has helped lead the campaign, went there in February. The World's David Baron was there too.

 

March 24, 2010
Mayo Clinic Alumni Association 66th Meeting, Profile of Speaker: Dr. John Hardman (PDF)
Published by Mayo Alumni magazine.
Carter Center President and CEO Dr. John Hardman (a Mayo Clinic alumnus) presented the prestigious Raymond D. Pruitt Lecture during the 2009 Mayo Clinic Alumni Association's biennial meeting. The lecture series honors individuals who have expertise in medical specialties or areas of research. Dr. Hardman's presentation on "Not Neglecting Neglected Diseases for 24 Years and Counting..." covered the Center's work to prevent diseases in the world's poorest countries in Asia, Africa and Latin America.

 

March 19, 2010
Sudanese Guinea Worm On the Point of Eradication. What next?
Published by www.telegraph.co.uk.
It's a particularly nasty individual, the Guinea worm. It grows as long as a metre inside its human host who has unwittingly drunk its larvae in contaminated water. It mates with another; then, after a year or so, it erupts through the person's skin, spewing thousands of its own larvae as it goes. And so the cycle continues.

 

March 17, 2010
Mali: Hoping to Eradicate Guinea Worm in Two Years
Published by IRIN (Integrated Regional Information Networks).
Mali is hoping to eradicate guinea-worm in the next two years, according to the World Health Organization (WHO).

 

March 16, 2010
Parasite Lost: Exterminating Africa's Horror Worms
Published by New Scientist magazine. Subscription required to read the full article.
It starts with a painful blister - a very painful blister. It feels, people say, like being stabbed with a red-hot needle. When the blister bursts, the head of a worm pops out, thin, white and very much alive. The rest of the worm, about a metre long, remains inside your body. It can take up to two months to pull it out, inch by agonising inch, during which time it may be impossible to walk. In extreme cases, you may host up to sixty of them, anywhere on your body. The worms can cause paralysis or lethal bacterial infections, and even if you survive mostly unscathed, next year it can happen all over again. The guinea worm (Dracunculus, or little dragon) is probably the closest living equivalent to the monsters in the Alien movies - except we're beating this enemy.

 

Feb. 19, 2010
Carter: Eradication of Guinea worm disease near in Sudan
Published by the Atlanta Journal-Constitution.
Former President Jimmy Carter said Friday that Sudan has made significant progress in its fight against Guinea worm disease.

 

Feb. 19, 2010
Carter: Parasitic Guinea Worm Cases Hit Record Low
Distributed by the Associated Press.
Global cases of Guinea worm disease have dropped to a new all-time low, former President Jimmy Carter said Friday, and health officials hope the infection that culminates in worms emerging from a victim's skin can be eliminated within two years.

 

Feb. 18, 2010
Audio: Jimmy Carter Discusses Guinea Worm Eradication During His Five Day Visit to Sudan
Published by Miraya 101 FM.
Miraya 101 FM is a United Nations Mission in the Sudan-run radio station in Southern Sudan. They work to provide independent and impartial news to national, regional, and international audiences in an effort to support democratic governance. Note: This is an .mp3 audio file.

 

Feb. 17, 2010
"Sudan in Pictures" Features Visit of Former U.S. President Jimmy Carter
The United Nations Mission in Sudan (UNMIS) regularly produces a series of pictorials called "Sudan in Pictures" to keep its staff and the public informed about activities in Sudan. The February 2010 edition of "Sudan in Pictures" features the visit of former U.S. President Jimmy Carter to the region.

 

Feb. 17, 2010
Stamping Out the Guinea Worm 'Dragons' of Sudan
Published by AFP (Agence France-Presse).
Scars on Severion Wayet's arms reveal where the flesh-burrowing Guinea worms burst through her skin. It was an agonising process that lasted days as the worms, measuring around one metre (three feet) in length, fought their way out of her body.

 

Feb. 17, 2010
Sudan: Final Push to Eradicate Guinea Worm
Published by IRIN (Integrated Regional Information Networks).
Guinea worm, the agonizing water-borne parasite, could be eradicated within "two to three years" from Southern Sudan, health officials say.

 

Jan. 26, 2010
And Then There Were Four: More Countries Beat Guinea Worm Disease
Reproduced from [Michelle Lodge, British Medical Journal 2010;340:c496] with permission from BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.
The number of countries remaining affected by guinea worm disease, or dracunculiasis, fell by two last year, leaving just four countries in Africa that continue to harbour the waterborne parasitic disease.

 

Dec. 31, 2009
Uganda Stamps Out Guinea Worm Disease
This article was published Dec. 31, 2009, by Daily Monitor/Monitor Publications Ltd.
Since 1991, Uganda has been campaigning to eradicate the Guinea worm. 18 years later, the ancient parasitic disease has been completely eliminated from the country, according to the World Health Organisation, making it the second major disease after smallpox to be wiped out.

 

Dec. 22, 2009
Carter Center Nears Goal Against Guinea Worm
Published by Voice of America.
In the last 12 months, no case of Guinea worm disease has been found in Nigeria.  It's a major step in former President Jimmy Carter's effort to eradicate the parasitic disease worldwide. The Carter Center has been leading the battle against Guinea worm - in partnership with the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and the World Health Organization.
Watch video >>

 

Dec. 9, 2009
Carter Center Landmark in Disease Eradication
Published by the Atlanta Journal-Constitution.
The Carter Center declared another major step in ridding the world of guinea worm disease. Nigeria, once the worst-afflicted country in the world with 653,000 cases, has not reported a case in 12 months, said Dr. Donald R. Hopkins, chairman of the International Task Force for Disease Eradication, which is based at the Carter Center. Only four countries – Ethiopia, Ghana, Mali and Sudan – still report guinea worm disease. About 3,000 were found as of last month, down from three million when former President Jimmy Carter began his efforts.

 

Dec. 7, 2009
Campaign to Eradicate Guinea Worm in Hard-Hit Nigeria May Have Worked
Published by The New York Times.
After 20 years, the Carter Center is ready to declare a major victory in its war on guinea worm: Nigeria, once the worst-afflicted country in the world, appears to be free of the worms.

 

Nov. 17, 2009
A Killer Blow to Guinea Worm (PDF)
Published by The News magazine.
At last, Nigeria is on its way to being free from the deadly and economically debilitating Guinea worm infection. This was the good news that came out of the recent three-day stock-taking stakeholders meeting in Abuja organized by the Carter Center. The Center and its partners have been involved in efforts to eradicate Guinea worm disease across the globe.

 

Oct. 5, 2009
Video: Sudan Wages War on Guinea Worms
Published by World Focus. Distributed to PBS stations nationwide. (Run time: 3:11)
Video report on Sudan's Guinea worm elimination campaign, in association with the Global Health Frontline News Project.
 

 

Oct. 4, 2009
It's Bye to Guinea Worm
Published on www.newswatchngr.com.
Latest statistics on Guinea Worm cases in Nigeria show that the country has won the battle to eradicate the disease.

 

Sept. 22, 2009
Chasing the Worm
Published in the British Medical Journal, 2009;339:b3892.
New cases of guinea worm disease in southern Sudan have recently fallen from 20,000 a year to an estimated 1500, and doctors are hoping that the disease will become the second in history to be eliminated.

 

Sept. 2, 2009
Countdown to Wipe Out Guinea Worm in Ghana (PDF)
World Health Organization Bulletin. Volume 87, Number 9, September 2009, 645-732.
Ghana could be one of the next African countries to say goodbye to Guinea worm. Amamata Sumani is on the front line in the war against Guinea worm disease (dracunculiasis) in Ghana — a front line that shrinks every year as the parasitic nematode retreats into its last remain­ing strongholds in the north of the country. Dracunculiasis transmission can be interrupted at two places in the parasites' life-cycle — by preventing people with open sores from contami­nating water sources, and by filtering drinking water
.

 

July 12, 2009
Ghana Fights Guinea Worm
Editorial published by Voice of America.
Guinea worm disease, a painful and crippling parasite affliction, has been almost entirely eradicated in Ghana, thanks to the tireless efforts of village-based volunteers and ministry of health staff, with assistance from The Carter Center, UNICEF, the World Health Organization, and other partner organizations.

 

July 4, 2009
Guinea Worm Nears Demise (Text no longer available)
Published by the Atlanta Journal-Constitution.
Philip Downs of Atlanta will know he is successful when he no longer has a job. Downs, 34, is the assistant director of the Guinea Worm Eradication Program at the Carter Center. After 23 years, the partners in the fight believe they are 18 months from success.

 

June 25, 2009
Ghana: Guinea Worm Eradication Program Gets Results in Country
AllAfrica.com article published on America.gov.
Guinea worm disease, which has crippled millions in Africa and Asia, is nearly vanquished in Ghana, thanks to the efforts of the Carter Center, which has been working with health workers in that country over the last 20 years.

 

April 4, 2009
The Lancet: "Africa Sees Obstacles to Guinea Worm Disease Eradication"
Published by The Lancet and reprinted with permission.
Experts are stepping up their efforts to eradicate guinea worm disease from the world. But the final push will not be easy in the six African countries with remaining cases, Wairagala Wakabi reports.

 

March 1, 2009
Guinea Worm Disease Afflicting Hundreds in Ghana
Published by Al Jazeera.
Dan Nolan visited a village in northern Ghana where health officials are working to help people affected by the guinea worm, which can grow up to one-meter long inside the bodies of its victims.

 

March 1, 2009
The End is Nigh for Guinea Worm Disease
Published in The Lancet Infectious Diseases. Reprinted with permission.
Eradication of Guinea worm disease, caused by the nematode parasite Dracunculus medinensis, is now close at hand. Cases fell to from 3.5 million cases in 1986 to a provisional 4643 cases in 2008, a reduction of 99.5 percent. "Only 1972 of last year's cases were uncontained," reported Ernesto Ruiz-Tiben, Director of the Guinea Worm Eradication Program at the Carter Center (Atlanta, GA, USA).

 

Feb. 18, 2009

CNN's "Impact Your World" on "Eradicating a Parasite"
This news segment features former U.S. President Jimmy Carter and Dr. Donald Hopkins, vice president of the Carter Center's health programs, discussing the international campaign to eradicate Guinea worm disease.

 

Feb. 3, 2009
CNN's "Inside Africa" "Guinea Worm Nearly Eradicated" Features Kelly Callahan
Carter Center expert Kelly Callahan was featured on CNNI's "Inside Africa" to discuss Guinea worm and Sudan. "Inside Africa" is a half-hour current affairs weekly program that provides global viewers with an inside look at political, economic, social and cultural affairs and trends in Africa.

 

Jan. 20, 2009
Grants Push Guinea Worm to All-Time Low
Published by the Emory Report.
Former U.S. President Jimmy Carter announced last month that cases of Guinea worm disease have reached an all-time low with fewer than 5,000 estimated cases remaining worldwide. To help eliminate the remaining cases, the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation and the United Kingdom Department for International Development (DFID) announced new commitments totaling $55 million to support the historic Carter Center-led eradication campaign.

 

Dec. 10, 2008
Video: Good Riddance, Guinea Worm
Published by GOOD News, a video news program produced by GOOD magazine's.
Host Roger Numbers, an animated character, conducts interviews on a wide range of issues including science, history, and economics.  In this video, Roger interviews Carter Center expert Kelly Callahan on the Dec. 2008 Guinea worm announcement of fewer than 5,000 cases remaining worldwide.

 

Sept. 1, 2008
Killing the Worm
Published by GOOD magazine. Issue 012, pages 106-115.
Disease eradication hasn't had a success since smallpox in 1979. Now, Guinea worm disease — in which a three-foot long worm burrows through its victim's body — is holding out in just a few African countries. The quest to wipe it out is slow and controversial, but the finish line is in sight.

 

Aug. 23, 2008
The Worm That Turned Back
Published by the Financial Times.
When Makoy Samuel Yibi Logora was growing up in a village in southern Sudan, no one there knew what caused Guinea worm. But they certainly understood its effects. The skin swells and becomes infected as a thin white parasitic worm takes several weeks to emerge slowly, agonisingly, through a huge blister.

 

May 10, 2008
Donald R Hopkins: Eradicating Guinea Worm Disease
Published by The Lancet. Registration is required to read the full article.
Disease eradication has proven to be a rare and maddeningly elusive goal for global-health experts over the years. Despite Herculean attempts to abolish malaria, yellow fever, polio, and other scourges, only the smallpox campaign has been completely successful. But now efforts to eliminate Guinea worm disease (dracunculiasis) look likely to succeed. One man has been on the front lines of both successful eff orts: Carter Center Vice President for Health Programs Donald R Hopkins.

 

March 31, 2008
A Village Woman's Legacy (PDF)
Published by TIME magazine.
An encounter with the victim of an old scourge gave a former President a new worldview — and a mission.

 

Jan. 25, 2008
Fighting the Scourge of the Guinea Worm
Published by TIME Magazine.
Photo slideshow: A Ghanaian village bands together to eradicate a debilitating parasite. Photographs by Peter DiCampo.

 

Nov. 28, 2007
Carter Center Expert Donald Hopkins Receives Prestigious Fries Prize for Guinea Worm Eradication Leadership
Poised to be the first parasitic disease eradicated in human history, Guinea worm disease now teeters on the verge of extinction. The 2007 Fries Prize for Improving Health was bestowed on Donald R. Hopkins, M.D., M.P.H., Carter Center vice president for health programs, for his sustained leadership in the global campaign to eradicate Guinea worm disease (dracunculiasis), a debilitating parasitic infection contracted from drinking contaminated water.

 

Nov. 12, 2007
Al Jazeera's The Pulse Investigates the Planned  Extinction of Guinea Worm From the Planet
Al Jazeera's The Pulse is a weekly series that showcases topical stories from around the world, and from laboratories working on new cures, vaccines, and treatments.
Scientists are on the verge of eradicating one of the oldest parasites that has been infecting humans for thousands of years – Guinea worm. The Pulse investigates how this is possible.

 

Oct. 24, 2007
Persistence Pays Off in Guinea Worm Fight (PDF)
American Medical Association. All rights reserved. Reproduced with permission of J.A.M.A.
Last February, when Ernesto Ruiz-Tiben, Ph.D., accompanied former U.S. President Jimmy Carter and his staff to Savelugu, Ghana, they were greeted with a heart-wrenching sight. More than 300 people, mostly children, flocked to a makeshift dracunculiasis clinic, hoping to obtain relief for pain so intense that the ancient Egyptians had called it a fiery serpent.

 

June 22, 2007
The Tail End of Guinea Worm — Global Eradication without a Drug or a Vaccine
Published by the New England Journal of Medicine.
"The Tail End of Guinea Worm — Global Eradication without a Drug or a Vaccine," by  Michele Barry, M.D.,  and includes four PowerPoint photo and data presentations.

 

May 12, 2007
Doctor Without Borders

Published by the Chicago Tribune.
In a dusty, open-air treatment center in Savelugu, Ghana, where patients are crying in pain, Dr. Donald R. Hopkins once again meets his enemy: Guinea worm disease.

 

May 10, 2007
Three-Part Video Feature: Lifting the Guinea Worm Curse
Published by the Chicago Tribune.
This feature contains three separate videos, "Still Inflicting Pain," "The Worm Killer," and "Front Line of Care."

 

April 4, 2007
Case Studies in Global Health: Millions Saved
Published by the Center for Global Development.
Written by Ruth Levine, Ph.D, Case Studies in Global Health: Millions Saved highlights 20 original public health large-scale success cases. The Guinea worm disease eradication campaign and river blindness control campaign are featured chapters in the book.
Read the full chapter (PDF).

 

March 16, 2007
Tough Fight in Final Struggle to Eradicate 'Fiery Serpents' That Plagued Israelites
Published by the Associated Press.
Savelugu, Ghana — The little girl screams in pain and convulsively reaches for the hand inflicting the torture — the hand slowly drawing a thin, white worm from her blistered foot.

 

March 3,  2007
Stamping Out Guinea Worm (PDF)
Published by NPR.
Guinea worm disease, long gone from the developed world, continues to persist in poorer nations. Now, a relentless effort to eradicate it in Nigeria is close to success. Soon, with help from U.S. donors, the Nigerian government and local health workers, guinea worm may be a problem of the past.

 

Feb. 18, 2007
Torture By Worms
Published by The New York Times.
Presidents are supposed to be strong, and on his latest visit to Africa Jimmy Carter proved himself strong enough to weep.
Click here for official reprint (PDF).

 

July 1, 2006
Slaying Little Dragons: Lessons From The Dracunculiasis Eradication Program (PDF)
Published by the American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene.
The word dracunculiasis comes from the Latin phrase "afflicted with little dragons." The global Dracunculiasis Eradication Program (DEP) spearheaded by President Jimmy Carter and The Carter Center has quietly "inched" towards world eradication with stunning success.

 

March 26, 2006
Dose of Tenacity Wears Down A Horrific Disease (PDF)
Published by The New York Times.
"Dose of Tenacity Wears Down a Horrific Disease" by Donald G. McNeil Jr. is the second in The New York Times "On the Brink" series of articles about five diseases — polio, Guinea worm, measles, blinding trachoma and lymphatic filariasis — that are extinct in the developed world but stubbornly persistent in some poor nations. As the diseases hover on the brink of eradication, doctors and scientists face daunting obstacles as they struggle to finish the job.
Related NYT video: Fighting Guinea Worm > | Related NYT slideshow: An Age-Old Problem >

 

Dec. 14, 2005 
Five Inspiring Women Delivering Hope Around the World
Published by Health Magazine and reprinted with permission.
The stories of five women — including Kelly Callahan — who traveled to the epicenter of human suffering in an effort to lend their support.

 

Nov. 4, 2005
David Branccacio Interview With Former U.S. President Jimmy Carter (Transcript, PDF)
Published by PBS NOW. Posted with permission.

 

Nov. 1, 2005
The End of a Scourge?
Published by National Geographic.
Feature article from November 2005 issue of National Geographic.

 

April 6, 2005
Gates, Carter Target Disease
Published by the Atlanta Journal-Constitution.

 

July 27, 2004
To The Source: Guinea Worm Eradication in Africa
Published by Emory Magazine.
Summer 2004 edition. Photos by Annemarie Poyo.

 

March 1, 2004
Guinea Worm Eradication in Ghana
Published by Africa Today magazine.
All hands to the plough, the dream of former U.S. President Jimmy Carter to bury the last Ghanaian Guinea worm in one of the fanciful Accra caskets may well be realised very soon.

 

Feb. 19, 2004
Africa Today Magazine Features Special Report on The Carter Center
Published by Africa Today magazine.
The Nov. 2003 issue of Africa Today features former U.S. President Jimmy Carter, The Carter Center, and the Guinea Worm Eradication Program.

 

April 1, 2003
Fighting the Dcourge of Guinea Worm
Published by Humanitarian Affairs Review and reprinted with permission.
The Guinea worm parasite causes devastating disease, with far reaching consequences for development. But eradication, even in many remote regions, is within reach. Roger Phillips, Nigeria Program Consultant at The Carter Center, describes how basic hygiene and larvicide are putting end to suffering.

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