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Schistosomiasis Control Program - In the News

May 9, 2018
New Initiative Will Drive Atlanta’s Reputation as the Center for Global Health
Published by Global Health ATL.
The Metro Atlanta Chamber, Georgia Global Health Alliance and Deloitte announced the launch of Global Health ATL. The initiative’s priorities are to create a health innovation hub in the heart of metro Atlanta and drive impact in areas such as disease eradication, economic development and disaster response.

Nov. 28, 2016
We Must Finish Fight Against Diseases We've Overlooked for Too Long
Published by CNN.
The first thing you notice about Jude is his playful spirit and insatiable curiosity. An inquisitive and talented 13-year-old boy in Nigeria, Jude loves going to school, practicing drums and playing soccer with his friends. He dreams of growing up to serve his community and nation.

Nov. 15, 2016
Community Hosts Outreach Milestone Celebration
Published by The Nation: Nigeria.
A rustic community in the Federal Capital Territory (FTC) was chosen to host the Carter Centre’s milestone of administering 500 million doses of medication to fight Neglected Tropical Diseases (NTDs) in 14 countries, including Nigeria, reports Vincent Ikuomola.

Oct. 2, 2017
Former President Jimmy Carter Chosen as 2017 Prix Galien Pro Bono Humanum Honoree
Published by PR Newswire.
The Galien Awards Committee announced today that former U.S. President Jimmy Carter will receive the 2017 Pro Bono Humanum Award at the 11th annual Prix Galien USA Awards Ceremony, to be held on Thursday, October 26, at the American Museum of Natural History in New York City.

Jan. 7, 2016
Smallpox and Dracunculiasis: the Scientific Value of Infectious Diseases That Have Been Eradicated or Targeted for Eradication. Is Schistosomiasis Next? (PDF)
Published by PLOS Pathogens.

Only one human disease has been completely eradicated: smallpox. A second, Dracunculiasis, is on the way out. The authors examine the feasibility of targeting schistosomiasis for eradication.

July 14, 2015
Bladder Cancer in Nigeria: Why Snails Matter
Published by The Guardian (Nigeria).
Unlike the western world where tobacco smoking is the main contributor to bladder cancer, the major risk factor in Nigeria is infection with a parasitic flatworm called Schistosoma hematobium. This infection is known as schistosomiasis (bilharziasis) or "snail fever." The major control effort in Nigeria has been through the Carter Centre, an America-based organization, which has been working in Delta, Nasarawa, Edo, and Plateau states since 1999.

Aug. 17, 2012
Meeting of the International Task Force for Disease Eradication, April 2012 (PDF)
Published by Weekly Epidemiological Record. 2012, 87, 305–316. Reprinted with permission.
The 19th Meeting of the International Task Force for Disease Eradication (ITFDE) was convened at the Carter Center, Atlanta, Ga. (United States), on April 12, 2012, to discuss the potential eradicability of schistosomiasis.

March 14, 2007
River Parasite Eats at Children
Published by the Chicago Tribune.
Flowing through the shantytowns and yam fields of this dust-choked region, the River Uke glimmers like a mirage, tiny white diamonds of sunlight dancing on its surface. As the temperature rises to 100 degrees, wiry boys run to the river and leap into its waters.

March 13, 2007
A Doctor's Lifelong Commitment to Fight Diseases (PDF)
Published by NPR.
Dr. Frank Richards specializes in the infectious diseases that are rampant in developing countries, especially diseases that target children. For the last 25 years, he has been regularly spending weeks or months away from his home and family, traveling on nearly impassable roads in hot, uncomfortable places to work with people who are struggling to survive.

March 12, 2007
Making the Case for Schistosomiasis (PDF)
Published by NPR.
Schistosomiasis affects millions of children in developing countries. A microscopic parasite slowly eats away at their intestines, their colon, their liver and their urinary tract, causing bleeding and anemia. Yet the debilitating disease does not kill, and it is not an international health priority.

Nov. 2, 2004
At The Old Swimming Hole, A Vicious Cycle Thrives
Published by The New York Times.
The pond was about the size of a school swimming pool, except it was surrounded by dry mud pocked with hundreds of hoofprints. A herd of goats was at one edge, drinking and defecating in the same spot. The sun was going down behind a thorn tree, backlighting 50 naked boys splashing one another in the warm dusk.

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