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Real Lives, Real Change: Mental Health Program

Fellowship Takes Reporting to a New Level

Newspaper reporter Jaclyn Cosgrove wanted to dig deeper into serious mental health issues, but the tools at hand weren’t adequate for the job. That changed dramatically when she received a Rosalynn Carter Fellowship for Mental Health Journalism. Learn More

Journalists Gain Insight into Mental Health

Last fall, 18 journalists met at The Carter Center to discuss an underreported health problem: mental illnesses. The meeting was part of the Rosalynn Carter Fellowships for Mental Health Journalism, which aim to enhance public understanding of mental health issues and reduce stigma and discrimination against people with mental illnesses through balanced and accurate reporting. Three fellows share their experience. Learn More

Center Mobilizes for Liberia's Ebola Fight

As the Ebola epidemic escalated in Liberia last fall, the nation's ministries and international public health agencies asked The Carter Center to help mobilize communities to identify cases of the disease and prevent its spread. Learn More

Colombia Alters Landscape of Mental Health Journalism

The successful expansion of Rosalynn Carter Fellowships for Mental Health Journalism in Colombia has led to increased reporting on topics of depression, PTSD, anxiety, and post-conflict trauma. Watch the video below to learn more about how journalism fellows in Colombia are breaking down barriers and transforming public perception of mental illness. Learn More

Reporter Tackles Parity, Affordable Care Act for Fellowship

Seattle Times columnist Jonathan Martin began his Rosalynn Carter Fellowship for Mental Health Journalism in September 2013 and planned to cover the Affordable Care Act. He was one of six U.S. and four international journalists selected for the annual program. Learn More

Breaking New Ground in Mental Health Journalism in Colombia

From their headquarters at Bogotá's Caracol television news, health reporters Paula Bedoya and Fernanda Hernández have covered the flu, prenatal care, eyesight, and cancer. But mental health is one medical topic these two journalists rarely, if ever, tackle. Learn More

Nicolae Ciorogan: Finding Common Ground on Mental Health

Looking back, Nicolae Ciorogan, 38, might tell you that his life has been a journey to learn about many different kinds of people — as a child growing up in Transylvania, Romania, a documentary filmmaker in the Peruvian Andes, and as a television photojournalist in Boston. Learn More

Brandon Kohrt: Working to Improve Mental Healthcare in Liberia One Story at a Time

A keyboard, an Internet connection, and a comfy coffee shop chair is one way to do research. But it's not the way for Dr. Brandon Kohrt, consultant to the Carter Center's Mental Health Liberia Project, who needs a good off-road vehicle and a compassionate ear to gather information about the beliefs, feelings, and experiences Liberians have surrounding mental illnesses. Learn More

Changing Headlines and Minds: Mental Health Journalism Fellowships Impact Romania

Only a few years ago, Chiscop was working as a deputy chief editor for the social issues section of Iasi Daily Newspaper, a major newspaper in a cultural and academic hub in eastern Romania. Learn More

The Carter Center at 30: A Voice for Mental Health Care

Under the leadership of former First Lady Rosalynn Carter, the Carter Center's Mental Health Program has increased awareness about mental health issues, informed public policy, and reduced stigma and discrimination against those with mental illnesses. Learn More

Meet Margaret Ballah: On the Frontlines of Mental Health Care in Liberia

If you ask Margaret Ballah to describe a typical day at work, she will tell you that there is no such thing. Every day Ballah rises at dawn, dons her crisp white uniform and shiny mental health clinician badge and walks several miles to Gbarzon Health Center in rural Grand Gedeh County, southeastern Liberia. Learn More

Journalism Fellow Kelly Kennedy Uncovers the Many Faces of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder

A mortuary services soldier came home angry and suicidal, having processed the dead faces and body parts of numerous service members. A well-loved first sergeant killed himself in front of his men. A platoon that had just lost several soldiers refused to go back on patrol, fearful that their rage would lead to more death. Learn More

Former First Lady Rosalynn Carter Launches Tour for "Within Our Reach: Ending the Mental Health Crisis"

"Within Our Reach: Ending the Mental Health Crisis," by Rosalynn Carter with Susan K. Golant and Kathryn E. Cade, published by Rodale Books. Learn More

Profile: Jerome Lawrence and The Carter Center Mental Health Program Picturing a Future of Recovery

There are a lot of images that convey the spirit of the Carter Center's work around the world, but few are as unusual and exuberant as a painting of bright red tulips by local Atlanta artist Jerome Lawrence. The vibrant, cheerful painting titled "Tulips are People II," was featured on the Carter Center's 2008 holiday card. Lawrence was selected not only for his artistic skill, but also because his life of recovery with schizophrenia is a message of hope for others struggling with mental illness. Learn More

Out of Hope Springs Tulips: Jerome Lawrence

Lawrence, whose pieces favor vivid colors and often depict natural subjects like flowers and landscapes, says the tulips were inspired by a springtime visit to the Center's grounds. He believes tulips, in their many shapes and hues, represent people from around the world and the beauty that can occur when we all work together. Learn More

Congo Women Confide Painful Reality to Fellow

In a refugee camp in the Democratic Republic of the Congo, journalist Jimmie Briggs listens via translator to a young woman describe being raped by soldiers. Briggs, an unlikely confidant as both a man and an American, is so devastated by her account he cannot continue taking notes. He begins to weep and offers to end the interview. The woman, "Madeline," refuses. Learn More

Mental Health Parity: A Q&A with Rosalynn Carter, Carter Center Mental Health Program Founder

Former First Lady Rosalynn Carter answers your questions. Learn More

Rosalynn Carter Symposium on Mental Health Policy - Interview with Director Thom Bornemann on Mental Illness Prevention

The 23rd Annual Rosalynn Carter Symposium on Mental Health Policy, held Nov. 7-8, 2007 at The Carter Center, examined current mental health prevention interventions-and potential policy barriers for implementation--for children, adolescents, adults, and older adults. The two-day event drew approximately 200 participants from the mental health community and other fields, including researchers, service providers, and consumer and advocacy groups, as well as policymakers from all levels of government. Learn More

In South Africa, a Journalist Finds Words for Unspeakable Tragedies

It was a recurring headline in South African newspapers: "Cop Murder-Suicide Claims Family." Dozens of sons, fathers, and husbands working in the South African Police Service had committed these crimes against their own families, but the stories of what motivated them were rarely told. Learn More

Mental Health Fellow Breaks Down Stereotypes

Time and money to access voluminous public records are luxuries most reporters do not have to investigate negligence or malfeasance in the public sector. Learn More

Journalism Fellowships Expand to Romania

Alex Ulmanu sometimes wonders if things could have been different. "I had a colleague in university who was a brilliant, brilliant person and who committed suicide in her very early 20s. We learned afterward that she was suffering from schizophrenia," Ulmanu said. Learn More

Carter Center Mental Health Program Observes World Mental Health Day

Mental illnesses affect people of all ages in all countries and societies, from the boy soldier in Sierra Leone traumatized by years of bloody civil war to the aging farmer in Oklahoma suffering from depression. These illnesses have a profound impact on the quality of life for individuals and families and stunt economic growth in societies around the world. Learn More

Emory Awards Honorary Doctorate to Longtime Carter Center Mental Health Supporter

ATLANTA....Beverly Benson Long, a mental health pioneer whose efforts were instrumental in establishing the Rosalynn Carter Endowed Chair for Mental Health at the Rollins School of Public Health at Emory University, was awarded an honorary Doctor of Science degree during Emory's 162nd commencement ceremony. Learn More

Reporters Find Inspiration in Mental Health Stories

In South Africa, men view depression as a sign of weakness. So when veteran journalist Marion Scher wrote a story on the topic for the South African magazine Men's Health, she was thrilled that the men she interviewed allowed her to use their real names. "That's very, very unusu­al," Scher said. "They really bared their souls to me." Learn More

Carter Center Calls for Better Mental Health Care for All Georgians

Five-foot-six-inches tall, Angela Ford's weight has varied from 90 pounds to her current 216. She struggles between anorexia and binge eating, and suffers from postpartum stress disorder and depression. She lives in Fulton County, Ga., which has no mental health services available to her. Even if it did, she couldn't afford it on disability checks anyway. Learn More

Dr. Thom Bornemann: Director Sees Need to Integrate Mental Health Into Health Care System

Although the words "reduce stigma" do not appear in the name of any initiatives of the Mental Health Program Thom Bornemann directs, the concept is embodied in virtually everything the program does. Learn More

Georgia Forum Identifies Strategies To Improve Mental Health Services for Children

"The day things changed was when someone finally sat down with me and explained what was going on in my brain," said Danielle Smith. "That's when I realized something actually was wrong with me. I wasn't just crazy." Learn More

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